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Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Trump's trade agenda may soon include restrictions on Chinese investment in U.S. companies, according to Politico.

Bottom line: No specific details have leaked, but this seemingly could curtail the strengthening trend of Chinese money plunging into U.S. companies, including Silicon Valley tech startups. If restrictions are applied to big spenders like Alibaba or Tencent, there could be severe retribution for U.S. investors who play heavily in China.

From Politico:

Trump told Cabinet secretaries and top advisers during a meeting at the White House last week that he wanted to soon hit China with steep tariffs and investment restrictions in response to allegations of intellectual property theft, according to three people familiar with the internal discussions.

Just yesterday we wrote that Trump's decision to block Broadcom's purchase of Qualcomm was, in part, an indirect proxy in the IP protection fight to come against China.

  • Globalist optimist: Trump is known to change his mind on just about everything.
  • Protectionist optimist: Trump is now marching to the beat of his own drummer more than ever before, and that drummer thinks trade wars are good.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

4 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving.
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions.
  3. World: Expert says COVID vaccine likely won't be available in Africa until Q2 of 2021 — Europeans extend lockdowns.
  4. Economy: The winners and losers of the COVID holiday season.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.