Trump's budget proposal. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump’s budget proposal would cut the Department of Health and Human Services’ funding by more than 20% next year, on top of nearly $300 billion in long-term savings from Medicare, Medicaid and other health programs.

Yes, but: No matter who the president is, presidential budgets are wish lists. These aren’t real cuts unless and until Congress makes them. And a lot of these cuts — like repealing the Affordable Care Act — are not going to happen any time soon.

The details: Trump’s budget outline calls for …

  • Repealing the Affordable Care Act.
  • Cutting federal Medicaid spending via a new system of capped payments.
  • A handful of new steps to lower the cost of prescription drugs, mostly in line with what the White House previewed last week.
  • Folding the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, along with some programs now housed within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, into the National Institutes of Health.
  • Cutting the CDC’s budget by $878 million next year, while increasing the Food and Drug Administration’s budget by $663 million and the National Institutes of Health by roughly $700 million.
  • Provide $10 billion, across HHS, for programs to combat the opioid epidemic.

Go deeper: Read HHS’ full budget brief here.

Go deeper

2020 election strategy: Hire all the lawyers

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus has sent overall U.S. unemployment into the double digits — but it's a sort of full-employment act for election law attorneys.

The big picture: The prospect of extended court fights over COVID-19-related voting changes, an absentee ballot avalanche, foreign interference and contested presidential results has prompted a hire-all-the-lawyers binge by candidates and campaigns — not just in swing states but around the country.

Right-wing media defanged by dissolving anti-Biden storylines

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The three biggest anti-Joe Biden storylines in right-wing media over the last year have either fizzled or are getting less online traction than they used to, according to data from NewsWhip provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: This dynamic has rendered a formidable media ecosystem less effective in boosting President Trump as we move into the heart of the 2020 campaign.

A coronavirus alarm bell is going off in the Midwest

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Positive rate shown is the 7-day average from June 1 to Aug. 6, 2020; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

A cluster of states in the Midwest are seeing more of their coronavirus tests coming back positive — potentially an early indicator of a growing outbreak.

The state of play: A high positive rate means that a higher share of those getting tested are sick. That could be because there are more sick people, or because a state isn't doing enough testing.