Feb 12, 2018

Trump budget proposes steep health care cuts

Trump's budget proposal. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump’s budget proposal would cut the Department of Health and Human Services’ funding by more than 20% next year, on top of nearly $300 billion in long-term savings from Medicare, Medicaid and other health programs.

Yes, but: No matter who the president is, presidential budgets are wish lists. These aren’t real cuts unless and until Congress makes them. And a lot of these cuts — like repealing the Affordable Care Act — are not going to happen any time soon.

The details: Trump’s budget outline calls for …

  • Repealing the Affordable Care Act.
  • Cutting federal Medicaid spending via a new system of capped payments.
  • A handful of new steps to lower the cost of prescription drugs, mostly in line with what the White House previewed last week.
  • Folding the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, along with some programs now housed within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, into the National Institutes of Health.
  • Cutting the CDC’s budget by $878 million next year, while increasing the Food and Drug Administration’s budget by $663 million and the National Institutes of Health by roughly $700 million.
  • Provide $10 billion, across HHS, for programs to combat the opioid epidemic.

Go deeper: Read HHS’ full budget brief here.

Go deeper

Trump administration asks Congress for $2.5 billion to fight coronavirus

President Trump with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar at the White House in September. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Trump administration sent a letter to Congress Monday requesting a funding commitment of at least $2.5 billion to help combat the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Details: The request for a lump sum account for the Department of Health and Human Services includes $1.25 billion in new funds to fight COVID-19 and $535 would come from untouched funds for the Ebola virus.

WHO won't call coronavirus a pandemic as cases spread

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The World Health Organization will not yet call the coronavirus a pandemic, claiming that needs across affected countries are too varied and the classification would increase fear, per a briefing Monday.

The big picture: As South Korea and Italy stepped up emergency measures in efforts to thwart the spread of the virus, WHO expressed concern about infections with no clear link to China. COVID-19 has killed at least 2,620 people and infected almost 80,000 others, with all but 27 deaths occurring in mainland China.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 4 hours ago - Health

The global scramble to contain the coronavirus

Taking precaution, in the Philippines. Photo: Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

The coronavirus is spreading quickly in cities nowhere near Wuhan, China, and the window to prevent a global pandemic is narrowing.

Zoom in: Here's a look at what comes with a coronavirus outbreak in communities outside China that have been hardest hit so far.

Go deeperArrow4 hours ago - World