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President Trump in Wilmington, North Carolina, on Sept. 2. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Half of likely voters surveyed in a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday said that having President Trump in the White House makes them feel less safe.

Why it matters: Trump has campaigned on the promise of  "law and order" by telling voters they "won't be safe in Joe Biden's America."

The big picture: The first batch of national polls released after the Republican and Democratic conventions show the former vice president keeping his national lead.

Remember: Four years after Trump defied expectations set by pollsters and news organizations, the public should have even less confidence that public opinion data can accurately pinpoint a winner, Axios' Sara Kehaulani Goo and David Nather report.

What they're saying: "While the president has been pushing the issue of safety to the center of the presidential campaign, it raises the question: Who most has your back, the current administration or the challengers?" Quinnipiac analyst Tim Malloy noted in a press release.

  • "As racial strife, a seemingly endless pandemic, and an economy on life support unnerve Americans, voters foresee a more reliable lifeline in the Biden Harris ticket."

The bottom line: Wednesday's Quinnipiac poll found that likely voters believe Biden would do a better job than Trump at handling racial inequality, the country's coronavirus response, health care and a crisis in general.

Methodology: 1,081 self-identified likely voters were surveyed over landlines and cellphones from Aug. 28-31, with a margin of error of ± 3.8 percentage points, in Quinnipiac's poll. The adult sample is weighted to recent Census data to match the demographic makeup of the U.S. population.

Go deeper

Progressives shift focus from Biden's Cabinet to his policy agenda

Joe Biden giving remarks in Wilmington, Del., last month. Photo: Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Some progressives tell Axios they believe the window for influencing President-elect Joe Biden’s Cabinet selections has closed, and they’re shifting focus to policy — hoping to shape Biden's agenda even before he’s sworn in.

Why it matters: The left wing of the party often draws attention for its protests, petitions and tweets, but this deliberate move reflects a determination to move beyond some fights they won't win to engage with Biden strategically, and over the long term.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.