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Data: Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. has suffered a steep decline in its global image and reputation in the aftermath of its response to the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey from the Pew Research Center shows.

The big picture: Since the start of the Trump administration in 2017, the global view of the U.S. has steadily declined. However, positive views of the U.S. are now at record lows according to Pew, and in none of the 13 countries surveyed "do more than a fifth think the U.S. has done at least a somewhat good job dealing with the virus."

Details: The percentage of people who have a favorable view of the U.S. dropped from 2019 to 2020 in Japan (-27), South Korea (-18), Italy (-17), Australia (-17), France (-17), the U.K. (-16), Canada (-16), the Netherlands (-16), Germany (-13), Spain (-12), and Sweden (-12). Pew also surveyed Denmark (34% favorability) and Belgium (24%), but data wasn't available for 2019.

  • At least 8 in 10 people in the 13 countries say the "U.S. has handled the virus badly."
  • Only one-third of Canadians view the U.S. positively. In Germany, only 26% of people have a positive view of the U.S., and only 10% have confidence in Trump's ability to handle world affairs.
  • South Korea holds the highest views of the U.S. among the countries surveyed, and it's the only one where a majority sees the U.S. positively at 59%. That's still a significant drop from 2017, when 75% of South Koreans held positive views about America.
  • In all of the Western European countries polled, support for the U.S. is higher among those who support right-wing populist parties in their own countries. Support for the U.S. is also higher among men than women.

The survey also looked at the views of five world leaders in addition to Trump. Even though confidence in Russian President Vladimir Putin (23%) and Chinese President Xi Jinping (19%) is extremely low, Trump (16%) still ranks below them among people in the 13 countries.

  • Confidence in German Chancellor Angela Merkel (76%), French President Emmanuel Macron (64%), and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (48%) was much higher.

By the numbers: The drop in confidence in Trump from 2019 to 2020 is stark.

  • South Korea had the biggest decline at 29%, followed by Italy (16%), the U.K. (13%), Australia (12%), and Japan (11%).
  • France, Canada and the Netherlands saw drops in confidence ranging between 9% and 7%, while Spain, Sweden and Germany dropped from 5% to 3% — though their confidence in 2019 was not very high to begin with.

Methodology: Pew reports the survey was conducted among 13,273 respondents in 13 countries — not including the U.S. — from June 10 to Aug. 3.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
Updated Nov 24, 2020 - World

Tracking Biden's first calls to world leaders

Combination images of New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and President-elect Joe Biden. Photo: NZ Prime Minister's Office/Instagram/Joe Raedle/Getty Images

One ritual of becoming president-elect is the carousel of congratulatory phone calls with other world leaders.

What to watch: The order in which the calls are returned is watched closely around the world.

Survey: Underrepresented employees face greater work challenges during pandemic

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

People of color, women and LGBTQ+ employees report greater difficulties working during the pandemic, according to a McKinsey report released last week.

Why it matters: Existing inequities have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. The disproportionate effects on these communities won't disappear as COVID-19 continues to ravage the world.

Microwave energy likely behind illnesses of American diplomats in Cuba and China

Personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba in Havana in 2017, after the State Department announced plans to halve the embassy's staff following mysterious health problems affecting over 20 people associated with the U.S. embassy. Photo: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

A radiofrequency energy of radiation that includes microwaves likely caused American diplomats in China and Cuba to fall ill with neurological symptoms over the past four years, a report published Saturday finds.

Why it matters: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's report doesn't attribute blame for the suspected attacks, but it notes there "was significant research in Russia/USSR into the effects of pulsed, rather than continuous wave [radiofrequency] exposures" and military personnel in "Eurasian communist countries" were exposed to non-thermal radiation.