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If the Trump administration has its way, our national parks may be set for a major overhaul that's much broader than just electric bikes on trails.

Driving the news: "At the urging of a controversial team of advisors, the Trump administration is mulling proposals to privatize national park campgrounds and further commercialize the parks with expanded Wi-Fi service, food trucks and even Amazon deliveries at tourist camp sites," the LA Times reports.

  • One proposal would phase out senior discounts during peak seasons.

Why it matters: The U.S. National Park Service is nearly $12 billion in the hole on necessary repairs that largely pre-date the Trump administration, according to Pew Trust.

The big picture: “Since taking office, President Trump and his administration have sought to privatize an array of public services," per the LA Times.

  • "At the same time, the White House has sought to reduce spending for many public services, such as its plan to cut the National Park Service’s budget by $481 million in 2020."
  • The committee's pitch for privatization: “There is also broad consensus that the current national park campground system, largely operated by federal employees, combines inadequate and outmoded visitor infrastructure," The Hill reports.

Between the lines: Many members of the committee, which was created by former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, would potentially benefit from privatization, the Washington Post previously reported.

  • Members include the operators of concession companies that have contracts at the parks, a company that produces electric bicycles and the former president of the world's largest private campground.

The bottom line: This might not have the edge of an impeachment fight, but any time the outdoors lobby and AARP are at potential loggerheads, look out.

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Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

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In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.