Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

"Is this person a citizen of the United States?" This is the controversial question the Trump administration will defend adding to the 2020 census questionnaire in a closely watched federal trial starting Monday in New York City.

Why it matters: This could determine the electoral map for future state legislative races and federal elections. Census data is used to apportion congressional seats and electoral college votes that determine the winner of presidential elections, as well as the distribution of federal funds among states.

Key arguments: The question has not been asked on the nation's standard census form since 1950. Amid brewing anti-immigration sentiments, critics said adding the question could produce an undercount because undocumented immigrants would refuse to participate in the decennial survey out of fear of being deported. As a result, the political power of heavily Democratic states with large immigrant communities would be diluted.

  • The administration argues that the question is not discriminatory, and that it would provide citizenship data for the Justice Department to better enforce Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, which aims to prevent voting rights violations.
  • But John Gore, the acting head of the DOJ's civil rights division, said in his deposition released late Sunday that the question is "not necessary" for enforcing the VRA.

The backdrop: For months, plaintiffs in the suit — 18 states, several cities and immigrant groups — and DOJ attorneys have been fighting over the disclosure of internal government documents and emails that show how the administration reached its decision.

  • Most notably, disclosed records contradicted Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross who told lawmakers in sworn testimony to Congress earlier this year that the DOJ “initiated the request for inclusion of the citizenship question” in December 2017. In fact, internal documents show that administration officials, including former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, had begun pushing for the question just months after taking office.
  • In March, when Ross announced he will add the question, he had downplayed concerns that it could lower the response rate. But in a January memo, the Census Bureau's chief scientist John Abowd warned it could produce "substantially less accurate citizenship status data."

The big picture: The case, one of six challenging the legality of Ross' decision, could be appealed all the way up to the Supreme Court. The high court has already intervened in the suit: The justices blocked a lower court’s ruling last month for Ross to sit for a deposition and answer questions under oath, and on Friday, they rejected the administration's request to delay the trail.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
3 mins ago - World

Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies, AP reports.

The state of play: Biden also planned to raise arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki, who said the call took place while she was delivering a press briefing. Psaki added that a full readout will be provided later Tuesday.

Biden signs racial equity executive orders

Joe Biden prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on September 3, 2020, in the aftermath of the police shooting of Jacob Blake. PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden on Tuesday signed executive orders on housing and ending the Justice Department's use of private prisons as part of what the White House is calling his “racial equity agenda.”

The big picture: Biden needs the support of Congress to push through police reform or new voting rights legislation. The executive orders serve as his down payment to immediately address systemic racism while he focuses on the pandemic.

Senate confirms Antony Blinken as secretary of state

Antony Blinken. Photo: Alex Edelman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 78-22 on Tuesday to confirm Antony Blinken as secretary of state.

Why it matters: Blinken, a longtime adviser to President Biden, will lead the administration's diplomatic efforts to re-engage with the world after four years of former President Trump's "America first" policy.