Jan 11, 2019

Republican Sen. Tim Scott blasts GOP "silence" on Steve King

Sen. Tim Scott (L) and Rep. Steve King (R). Photos: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call and Alex Wong via Getty Images

Republican Sen. Tim Scott criticized the GOP's response to racism in a Washington Post op-ed, specifically calling out Republican officials' silence on Rep. Steve King’s comments in a New York Times article that questioned why terms like "white supremacist" are considered offensive.

What he's saying: "Some in our party wonder why Republicans are constantly accused of racism — it is because of our silence when things like this are said. ... When people with opinions similar to King’s open their mouths, they damage not only the Republican Party and the conservative brand but also our nation as a whole."

  • "Immigration is the perfect example, in which somehow our affection for the rule of law has become conflated with a perceived racism against brown and black people."
  • "King’s comments are not conservative views but separate views that should be ridiculed at every turn possible."

The big picture: Some prominent Republicans have spoken out against King, including GOP conference chair Liz Cheney, who tweeted that the comments were "abhorrent" and "racist." House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, NRCC Chairman Tom Emmer and Michigan Republican Rep. Justin Amash have denounced King's comments as well.

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Mass shooting in Milwaukee: What we know

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in 2012. Photo: John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images

Six people died in a shooting at the Molson Coors Brewing Company in Milwaukee on Wednesday, including the gunman, Mayor Tom Barrett told reporters at a Wednesday evening press conference with local police.

Details: All of the victims worked at the brewery complex, as did the shooter who died of "an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound," police confirmed in a statement late Wednesday.

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Coronavirus updates: South Korea case count tops 2,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

33 people in California have tested positive for the coronavirus, and health officials are monitoring 8,400 people who have recently returned from "points of concern," Gov. Gavin Newsom said Thursday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has killed more than 2,850 people and infected over 83,000 others in some 50 countries and territories. The novel coronavirus is now affecting every continent but Antarctica, and the WHO said Wednesday the number of new cases reported outside China has exceeded those inside the country for the first time.

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Syria's darkest chapter

Family room without a family, in Idlib. Photo: Muhammed Said/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The worst humanitarian crisis of Syria’s brutal civil war is colliding today with what could be the war’s most dangerous geopolitical showdown, after at least 29 Turkish troops were killed in an airstrike.

The big picture: The fighting is taking place in Idlib in northwest Syria, where a ferocious Syrian and Russian offensive has displaced 1 million civilians and infuriated Turkey, which borders the region.

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