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Jammal Lemy and Emma Gonzales in Chicago on June 15, the start of the summer campaign. Photo: Jim Young/AFP/Getty

The surprising endurance of the U.S. student anti-gun violence movement is usually traced to the February murder of 17 teens and teachers in Parkland, FL., and the rage of a tight group of hard-edged, culture-wise classmates there.

The long-term future impact of their campaign, if any — such as whether there will be a broader "Parkland generation" with an important legacy — can't yet be known. But there already are signs of a Parkland effect.

  • The movement, called March for Our Lives, has swollen to include youth from many of the nation's major cities, driven by grief and anger over a two-decade failure to secure their safety, and determined to stop the bloodletting. (See this post)
  • They befriended one another along a 59-day bus journey through two dozen states, ending Sunday, and now have fanned out back home.
  • Their explicit aim: to bulk up typically anemic youth voting, and in November oust national and state lawmakers who they say are tools of the National Rifle Association, their stated foe.

Early data suggest they are having an impact both on laws and on voter registration.

  • Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a political consultancy, says a survey of 39 states shows a surge of youth voter registration.
  • The most dramatic shift is in Pennsylvania, a battleground state: In the 75 days prior to Parkland, people younger than 30 were 45% of all new registered voters there. But in the 75 days afterward, they were 61.4%. If history holds, these new registrants will vote Democrat 2-1, says Bonier.
  • Since Parkland, some 50 new gun laws have been passed across the country, including in 14 states with Republican governors, according to Pew. "They have turned tragedy into a civic state of mind," Bonier tells Axios. "Suddenly, younger people are forced to care about who their elected officials are."

The bottom line: The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High students and their national network have animated U.S. politics. They are well-funded, raising at least $5.7 million between a GoFundMe campaign and $2 million from Hollywood personalities. To the extent they are able to mobilize youth on election day, they could decide numerous close races.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with First Lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.