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Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

The teachers strikes show no signs of slowing down, with Arizona educators rejecting a deal and Colorado teachers remaining out of classrooms.

Why it matters, as told by Axios' Mike Sykes: "The pressure is on for state legislators to meet the demands of teachers or else strikes will continue. If they don't, we could see strikes lasting for more than a week."

Factors at play:
  • Teachers wages have been stagnant since the Great Recession. [Axios]
  • Educators end up buying classroom materials out of their own pockets. [Axios]
  • State pensions are woefully underfunded, with a $1.4 trillion deficit as of 2016. "That puts downward pressure on wages and benefit checks as governments struggle to close the funding gap." [AP]
The battlegrounds:
  • West Virginia: 5% pay increase secured.
  • Oklahoma: $450 million in new tax revenue for education secured.
  • Kentucky: Teachers managed to pressure the Republican legislature to override education cuts.
  • Arizona: Seeking 20% raise. The state's Republican legislature and governor have a deal to get that raise done by 2020, but teachers want it immediately.
  • Colorado: Teachers have walked out to protest stagnant pay and education funding that has failed to keep pace with inflation.

Go deeper: Our latest Axios video features the challenges faced by teachers

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.

AOC and Ilhan Omar want to block Biden’s former chief of staff

Reps. Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar are boosting a petition against Joe Biden nominating his former chief of staff to a new role in his administration, calling Bruce Reed a "deficit hawk” and criticizing his past support for Social Security and Medicare cuts.

Why it matters: Progressives are mounting their pressure campaign after the president-elect did not include any of their favored candidates in his first slate of Cabinet nominees, and they are serious about installing some of their allies, blocking anyone who doesn't pass their smell test — and making noise if they are not heard.