Sep 28, 2019

The process of impeachment

Diagram: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Although three U.S. presidents have faced impeachment, none have been removed from office. Presidents Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton were both impeached, but the Senate declined to remove them from office, and Richard Nixon stepped down before the House could vote.

How it works: Below is a graphic that explains the typical procedures for impeachment and removal from office.

Diagram: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Go deeper: National Constitution Center analysis of Article II, Section 4

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Trump's impeachment poll warnings

Data: Nixon survey by Gallup, Clinton survey by CNN, Trump survey by Monmouth University. (The Gallup question changed from "Do you think President Nixon should be impeached and compelled to leave the Presidency, or not?" to "Do you think his actions are serious enough to warrant his being removed from the Presidency, or not?" after Feb. 1974.) Chart: Axios Visuals

Public support for President Trump's impeachment is higher than it was for Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton when the House launched impeachment inquiries against them.

Why it matters: Support for impeachment of Trump is still less than half the country — 44% in the Monmouth University poll shown here; 47% in a CNN poll. And the polling reflects a 50-50 country. But the Ukraine scandal is pushing the numbers up.

Go deeperArrowOct 6, 2019

Trump's speedy impeachment process

Chart: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

It's been nearly one month since Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced a formal impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24.

Why it matters: It's remarkable how fast it has gotten off the ground. You can see how quickly the Ukraine phone call came out of nowhere to become the all-consuming impeachment topic — way faster than the impeachment inquiries into Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

Go deeperArrowOct 22, 2019

Pence tells House committees he will not cooperate in impeachment inquiry

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The counsel for Vice President Mike Pence sent a letter to the chairmen of the House committees investigating President Trump and Ukraine on Tuesday informing them that he will not cooperate with a request for documents in their "self-proclaimed" impeachment inquiry.

Why it matters: This is in line with the White House's current stance of blanket noncooperation, which has prompted the House chairmen conducting the investigation to warn that defiance could be used as evidence of obstruction in a future article of impeachment. Some have speculated that Speaker Nancy Pelosi could call the White House's bluff and announce a full House vote authorizing the impeachment inquiry, daring the administration to continue to defy subpoenas and document requests.