Feb 21, 2018

14 teachers have been killed on the job since 2012

A memorial to Aaron Feis, the football coach of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, who was among the 17 killed there on Feb. 14. Photo: Jonathan Newton / The Washington Post / Getty

The three high school teachers killed a week ago in Parkland, FL, made it 14 teachers and staff who have lost their lives in school shootings over the last six years, according to a count by Axios using the raw data at Everytown Research. At least 15 more have been injured.

Quick take: Nowhere on the planet have such shootings occurred with anywhere near the frequency as the U.S. While students and parents across the country are grieving with the Parkland victims and survivors, a root of the conversation since then is visceral apprehension of what could happen on any campus in the country, on any day.

  • While posted in danger spots abroad as a foreign correspondent I, like hundreds of other reporters, was sent for week-long training in how to respond in violent situations such as shootings, bombings and kidnappings.
  • I asked Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, whether teachers should have similar training, in addition to the lockdown preparation they already undergo. She rejected the idea:

"No one, even when you get combat training, you are not prepared for an assault on you. No one is going to be prepared for someone walking in with an AR-15 in a school, a church, and what that man did in Las Vegas," she said.

The AFT has issued a call to action to oppose efforts to arm teachers. Guns are "absolutely antithetical to schools," she said. But something must be done to protect teachers, she said: "Teachers are naked. They are shielding kids. That is not what any of us or students signed up for."

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Protests for George Floyd continue for 10th day

Thousands of protesters march over the Brooklyn Bridge on June 4 in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

All four former Minneapolis police officers have been charged for George Floyd’s death and are in custody, including Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, who were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

The latest: Crowds gathered in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Thursday evening and in Atlanta, Georgia, despite the rain. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms joined demonstrators on Thursday. Demonstrators in Washington, D.C. dispersed following a thunderstorm and rain warning for the region.

Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

2 hours ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.