Jan 5, 2018

The mystery of Miles Kwok and Steve Bannon

Billionaire Miles Kwok poses at his NYC apartment in November 2017. Photo: Timothy A. Clary / AFP / Getty Images

Drudge tweeted Thursday "LIFE AFTER MERCER! BANNON FINDS NEW BILLIONAIRE, MILES KWOK..."

Background: Miles Kwok, aka Guo Wengui, is a controversial, self-proclaimed billionaire and member of Mar-a-Lago who fled China and has taken up refuge in a Manhattan penthouse while awaiting a decision on his U.S. asylum application.

Beijing has been trying for months to get him back, including, as the Wall Street Journal reported in October, using Steve Wynn as an intermediary to ask Trump to repatriate him.

"President Donald Trump received a letter from the Chinese government, hand-delivered by Steve Wynn, a Las Vegas casino magnate with interests in the Chinese gambling enclave of Macau. Mr. Trump initially expressed interest in helping the Chinese government by deporting Mr. Guo, but other senior officials worked to block any such move, according to people familiar with the matter," WSJ reported.

What's happening now: Kwok was very active on Twitter until suddenly going quiet in late November. Before his Twitter break, he tweeted about several meetings with Steve Bannon, and his pinned tweet shows him with Bannon.

My thought bubble: Drudge provides no further evidence beyond the tweet, but I have been hearing similar things. Given Bannon's apparent issues with donors, Kwok and Bannon's convergent views of the PRC, and their love of the spotlight, this could be an interesting partnership. That is, until it collapses in recrimination, as every partnership eventually seems to do for both men.

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Virus vices take a toll on Americans

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Americans are doubling down on their worst habits to cope with the mental and emotional stress of the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The pandemic will have a long-lasting impact on health of the American people, in part due to the habits they will pick up during the weeks and months they are forced to stay home.

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  4. 2020 latest: "We have no contingency plan," Trump said on the 2020 Republican National Convention. "We're having the convention at the end of August."
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World coronavirus updates: Confirmed cases top 1.2 million

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The number of novel coronavirus cases surpassed 1.2 million worldwide Saturday night, as Spain overtook Italy as the country with the most infections outside the U.S.

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