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From an analysis by Alexander Kliment and Gabe Lipton of Eurasia Group Media's Signal newsletter, here are some of the most popular leaders of the world's large countries:

Behind the numbers: Given that the state controls TV, where 90% of Russians get their news, Putin is certainly able to shape people's perceptions. But it would be a mistake to simply assume that this means his approval rating is "fake." Many Russians genuinely support him.

  • South Korea's Moon has won sympathy by taking a common man approach in sharp contrast to the aloof stylings of his predecessor, who was impeached for corruption.
  • Indonesia's Widodo has maintained his popularity by tackling corruption and improving people's standard of living.
  • In Marci's Argentina, the economy turned around just in time for his party to win important midterm elections late last month that will boost his efforts to reverse years of economic mismanagement by his predecessors.
  • And Trudeau's Canada has become the fastest growing economy among the world's seven advanced economies.

Go deeper: The world's most unpopular leaders

Go deeper

Microwave energy likely behind illnesses of American diplomats in Cuba and China

Personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba in Havana in 2017, after the State Department announced plans to halve the embassy's staff following mysterious health problems affecting over 20 people associated with the U.S. embassy. Photo: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

A radiofrequency energy of radiation that includes microwaves likely caused American diplomats in China and Cuba to fall ill with neurological symptoms over the past four years, a report published Saturday finds.

Why it matters: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's report doesn't attribute blame for the suspected attacks, but it notes there "was significant research in Russia/USSR into the effects of pulsed, rather than continuous wave [radiofrequency] exposures" and military personnel in "Eurasian communist countries" were exposed to non-thermal radiation.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to help overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.