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Jacquelyn Martin / AP

The Senate's current leading option for how to revise Medicaid is to phase out the Affordable Care Act's expansion more slowly than the House did, but grow a per-person funding cap at the same rate as the House bill, according to two GOP aides.

This isn't a final plan, but it is the recommendation Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made to Senate Republicans on Tuesday. One of the aides said members are still fighting over the growth rate. Conservatives have been calling for a lower rate, and moderates want an even longer glidepath away from the expansion than the one being proposed.

More details:

  • Medicaid expansion: The House bill would immediately reduce enhanced federal spending for Medicaid expansion in 2020, except for people who were already enrolled in the program. New enrollees would receive the state's traditional match rate, which is much lower than the enhanced one under the ACA.The Senate proposal would create instead a three-year glidepath beginning in 2020 down to the lower matching rate to give states more time to adjust to the reduced funding.This was Sen. Rob Portman's idea, although he is pushing for a seven-year transition period.
  • Per-person cap: This would grow over time at the same rate as the House bill, which was tied to medical inflation. Conservative Republicans want the growth rate to be lower than that.

Go deeper

Trump sues New York Times and his niece over tax report

Former President Trump hosting a boxing match in Hollywood, Florida on Sept. 11. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Trump filed a lawsuit against the New York Times and his niece Mary Trump on Tuesday over the news outlet's reporting on his tax records, the Daily Beast first reported.

Details: The lawsuit, filed in New York's Dutchess County, alleges the NYT "engaged in an insidious plot to obtain confidential and highly-sensitive records" and that it "convinced" Mary Trump to "smuggle records out of her attorney's office and turn them over to The Times."

House passes government funding, debt ceiling bill

Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The House passed a bill on Tuesday to fund the government through early December, along with a measure to raise the debt ceiling through December 2022.

Why it matters: The stopgap measure, which needs to be passed to avoid a government shutdown when funding expires on Sept. 30, faces a difficult journey in the Senate where at least ten Republicans would need to vote in favor.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The Democrats' debt dilemma

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Democrats find themselves in a political and potentially catastrophic economic quagmire as Republicans stand firm on denying them any help in raising the federal debt ceiling.

Why it matters: The Democrats are technically right — the debt comes, in part, from past spending by President Trump and his predecessors, not only President Biden's new big-ticket programs. But Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is saddling them with the public relations challenge of making that distinction during next year's crucial midterms.

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