Nov 18, 2017

The gun control legislation even Republicans like

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy introduced a bill aimed to make it harder for individuals who shouldn't be able to purchase a gun to eventually get ahold of one, and it's quickly gaining support from Republicans, per The Atlantic.

Why it matters: The bill would make the federal background check system for gun sales more strict. This is particularly important to lawmakers on both sides of the aisle after it was revealed the Holland Air Force Base didn't update its database with relevant information about the Sutherland Springs church shooting suspect -- information that would have barred him from getting a gun.

This also matters because one GOP congressman told reporters a week after the church shooting that he worried the trend of not updating these databases is "a bigger problem than we've seen.

Lawmakers who support the bill: Democratic Sens. Murphy, Jeanne Shaheen, Richard Blumenthal, and Dianne Feinstein, and GOP Sens. John Cornyn, Orrin Hatch, Tim Scott, and Dean Heller.

GOP senators won't have to worry about supporting what might seem like a gun control bill. As Chris Cox of the NRA said in a statement to The Atlantic: "We applaud Sen. John Cornyn's efforts to ensure that the records of prohibited individuals are entered into NICS. The National Rifle Association has long supported the inclusion of all legitimate records in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System."

But its main setback from passing is getting support from congressional leadership. Mitch McConnell's spokesman told The Atlantic they're reviewing the bill, but some worry this legislation could stall in Congress like other attempts at gun legislation.

Go deeper: All the people who can't legally purchase a gun.

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American carnage

Protesters race up a hill to avoid tear gas in Philadelphia, June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The list of victims has swiftly grown since George Floyd died in police custody just eight days ago.

The big picture: Protests against police brutality have turned into a showcase of police brutality, with tear gas and rubber bullets deployed against crowds. The police have the arsenals at their disposal, but we're also seeing law enforcement officers becoming targets.

McConnell blocks resolution condemning Trump's actions against peaceful protesters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked a resolution introduced by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday that would have condemned the use of tear gas and rubber bullets against peaceful protesters outside the White House on Monday in order to allow President Trump to walk to St. John's Church.

What they're saying: "Justice for black Americans in the face of unjust violence, and peace for our country in the face of looting, riots, and domestic terror. Those are the two issues Americans want addressed," McConnell said on the Senate floor.

George W. Bush breaks silence on George Floyd

Goerge Bush in Michigan in 2009. Photo: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush (R) wrote in a statement Tuesday that he and his wife, Laura, are "anguished" by the death of George Floyd, and said that "it is time for America to examine our tragic failures."

Why it matters: It's a stark juxtaposition when compared to fellow Republican President Trump's response to current civil unrest. While Trump has called for justice in Floyd's death, he's also condemned protestors and threatened to deploy military personnel if demonstrations continue.