Dec 20, 2017

The GOP finally killed the ACA's individual mandate

Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

There were plenty of reasons to think the individual mandate was here to stay. It was a linchpin of Republicans' failed effort to defeat the Affordable Care Act in 2010. They couldn't persuade the Supreme Court to strike it down in 2012, or muster enough votes in that year's elections to do it themselves. They failed to repeal it once again in July. This July. Not even five months ago. And yet, here we are.

The bottom line: As important as the passage of Republicans' tax overhaul is for tax policy, and for President Trump's legislative agenda and Paul Ryan's legacy and everything else, this is at least as big a moment in the life of the ACA. After years upon years of dire warnings about what would happen to the ACA without an individual mandate, we're about to find out in a live experiment.

Yes, but: I asked some of the other people who have ridden out the entire individual-mandate saga whether they're as surprised as I am to see the coverage requirement actually about to vanish. They are mostly surprised Republicans haven't achieved more.

  • "I am in some ways surprised they didn't repeal the law," says former Rep. Henry Waxman, who helped write the House version of the ACA.
  • Conservative policy analyst Chris Jacobs sort of agrees with Waxman, though obviously by coming at it from the other side, noting Republicans' years of campaign promises to roll back the law's regulatory requirements.
  • "I know the [Mitt] Romney folks drafted a whole reconciliation bill in 2012," Jacobs says. "If this is all we get out of it? No."
  • "I don't think it's that big an accomplishment, because [the mandate] has always been unpopular," Jacobs says.

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FEC commissioner refutes Trump's voter fraud claims

Federal Election Commission Ellen Weintraub during a committee hearing in the Capitol in 2017. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Federal Election Commission commissioner Ellen Weintraub posted an extensive fact-checking thread to Twitter late Wednesday debunking claims by President Trump and some Republicans that mail-in voting can lead to fraud.

Why it matters: Weintraub weighed in after Trump threatened to take action against Twitter for fact-checking him on his earlier unsubstantiated posts claiming mail-in ballots in November's election would be fraudulent, and she directly addressed Twitter's fact-checkin of the president in her post.

China approves Hong Kong national security law

Hong Kong riot police round up a group of protesters during a demonstration on Wednesday. Photo: Willie Siau/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Chinese lawmakers approved a plan on Thursday for a sweeping national security law for Hong Kong that would criminalize sedition, foreign influence and secession in the Asian financial hub.

Why it matters: China bypassed Hong Kong's legislature and chief executive to introduce the law, prompting Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to announce Wednesday that the city is no longer autonomous from the Chinese mainland and does not warrant special treatment under U.S. law.

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Minneapolis unrest: One man dead amid protests over George Floyd

Protesters and police clash during demonstration on Wednesday over the death of George Floyd in custody outside the Third Police Precinct. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

A man died in a Minneapolis shooting during a second night of clashes between police and protesters in the city over the death of George Floyd, an African American man who died in police custody, per AP.

The latest: Police said officers were responding to reports of a stabbing just before 9:30 p.m. and found a man lying in "grave condition on the sidewalk" with a gunshot wound, CBS Minnesota notes. One man is in custody over the suspected homicide, AP reports.