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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Gig economy companies have largely dodged the costs of worker benefits and protections — but now, amid the coronavirus crisis, find themselves struggling to keep both customers and workers on board.

What’s happening: They're juggling mismatched supply and demand, and asked to alleviate everyone's financial strains.

Driving the news: Yesterday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told investors that his firm's ride-hailing business has dropped 60-70% in Seattle so far this year compared with the same period of 2019.

  • Earlier this month, Uber said it will compensate drivers for up to 14 days if they are diagnosed with COVID-19 or asked to self-isolate or quarantine — since they don’t have paid time off as independent contractors.
  • Lyft, Instacart, and others are providing similar compensation.

This still leaves a lot of drivers worried and frustrated. They have to keep working to generate income — and fulfill consumer demand — despite the risk of getting infected by passengers.

Other firms are attempting similar balancing acts. Food delivery companies are seeing a surge in demand as people stay home and restaurants are forced to serve takeout only.

  • Drivers face the same health and financial risks.
  • Some companies are waiving certain restaurant fees, though they’re mostly focused on new eatery signups.

The clearest tension between the two sides of the marketplace is playing out at Airbnb: Travelers want refunds for their canceled reservations, but hosts want to keep the money, especially if it’s a significant source of their income.

The bottom line: These companies have spent years claiming that they are simply neutral marketplaces and that their workers and hosts are “entrepreneurs” — but leaving those people with all financial responsibility is backfiring now.

  • The firms are asking the federal government to relieve drivers, restaurants, and hosts’ economic strain.
  • Even if Uncle Sam does step in, the companies are already facing public pressure to help now.

Go deeper

15 mins ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.

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