Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams / U.S. Navy via AP

The far right broke out on social media to express distaste for Trump's decision to launch airstrikes in Syria in response to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's use of banned chemical weapons against its citizens earlier this week.

Why the resistance? Because it is "the most legally doubtful use of military force by a NATO state in recent history," as Craig Forcese, Professor of security and public international law at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law, puts it. There are two instances where a state can use force against another: for self-defense or when the Security Council authorizes it.

Here's what they're saying:

A few more...

  • Chuck Johnson: "I will spend every minute of 2020 working to defeat Trump if we invade Syria"
  • Lauren Southern live-streamed her disapproval on Twitter via Periscope, saying "literally no one wants to do this"

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Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi called for establishing "benefits funds" for gig workers in a New York Times op-ed out Monday.

Why it matters: Gig workers, who remain independent contractors and not employees, have long pushed companies like Uber for benefits comparable to those received by traditional workers. The coronavirus pandemic and its resultant economic strain has broadened those calls.

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President Trump is trying to lure Joe Biden into a Walter Mondale trap — attempting to force the Democratic nominee to embrace middle-class tax increases as part of his election strategy.

Why it matters: With his Saturday evening executive action to unilaterally rewrite the tax code, Trump again is demonstrating the lengths to which he’ll go to change the conversation — and try to make the election a choice between him and Biden, and not a referendum on him.

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The coronavirus pandemic, Black Lives Matter protests and a looming election have brought long-simmering conflicts between tech platforms and President Trump to a boil, as Facebook, Twitter and other services are starting to take presidential misinformation seriously.

What's happening: Wary of becoming arbiters of political speech, tech's platforms have carved out a range of exceptions and immunities for Trump and other political leaders — but that accommodation is coming undone.