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On Wednesday morning, Axios Cities Correspondent Kim Hart discussed the impact of COVID-19 on education, from school reopening with Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly, the homework gap with Khan Academy CEO Sal Khan and the importance of broadband in remote learning with FCC chairman Ajit Pai.

Gov. Kelly was one of the fastest governors in the country to move to close school buildings at the start of the outbreak and highlighted the collective efforts of education experts around the state.

  • How the state of Kansas took immediate action: "We had about 40 of the best and brightest teachers from across the state of Kansas with some administrators and some counselors come together and [create] a very comprehensive, very thorough package of learning tools for our kids. They thought beyond just what kids needed to learn, but also what other functions do our schools provide for our kids?"
  • On whether schools will be open come fall: "We fully expect that there will be a second wave of this virus come in the fall...It's way too early to call whether or not we'll actually open the schools' buildings in the fall...We will anticipate the worst and be ready to continue online academic packets to go and school nutrition programs to go if that's what we need to do."

Sal Khan discussed how Khan Academy and other online learning platforms are stepping up in this nationwide shift to online learning.

  • On how online learning has been used to fill in educational gaps: "Half of our usage is formal usage inside of schools where it allows teachers to support, say, 30 students in a classroom who all need to learn at different [rates]. We know that every student has different gaps...And they need an opportunity to fill in those gaps."

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai discussed the importance of broadband during the coronavirus pandemic, underscoring its use in remote learning and telehealth services.

  • On progress the FCC has made since 2016: "If you look at the statistics, for example, from 2016 to 2018, the number of Americans who didn't have access to 25 megabits per second broadband...fell by 30 percent. The number of Americans with access to 250 megabits per second broadband increased in 2018 alone by some 47 percent. The number of rural Americans with that access tripled from [2016 to 2018]."

Thank you to our partner Heartland Forward and our sponsor the Walton Family Foundation.

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Jul 29, 2020 - Health

Reopening schools is a lose-lose dilemma for many families of color

Reproduced from KFF Health Tracking Poll; Note: Share includes responses for "very/somewhat worried", income is household income; Chart: Axios Visuals

Children of color have the most to lose if schools remain physically closed in the fall. Their families also have the most to lose if schools reopen.

Why it matters: The child care crisis created by the coronavirus pandemic is horrible for parents regardless of their race or income, but Black and Latino communities are bearing the heaviest burden.

Resurrecting Martin Luther King's office

King points to Selma, Alabama on a map at his Southern Christian Leadership Conference office in Atlanta in January 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Contributor

Efforts to save the office where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned some of the most important moments of the civil rights movement are hitting roadblocks amid a political stalemate.

Why it matters: The U.S. Park Service needs to OK agreements so a developer restoring the historic Prince Hall Masonic Lodge in Atlanta — which once housed King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference — can tap into private funding and begin work.

Off the Rails

Episode 4: Trump turns on Barr

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Drew Angerer, Pool/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 4: Trump torches what is arguably the most consequential relationship in his Cabinet.

Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."