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The economic giants with not-so-social media

Only 37% of Germans use social media, according to a new Pew survey, a surprising figure given the fact that Germany is the world's fourth-largest economy by GDP, according to the World Economic Forum. Similar patterns follow for Japan, France and Italy, ranked 3rd, 6th and 8th in largest economy by GDP.

Data: Pew Research Center; Note: Percentages based on total sample; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Why it matters: The report shows that internet access doesn't necessarily lead to social media use, but rather it's a product of cultural norms and age. Japan, Germany and Italy have some of the lowest levels of social media use, and they all have some of the world's oldest populations. In Germany, users report being more concerned about online privacy, and particularly data privacy, which affects their social media use. Other studies suggest that Eastern vs. Western mentalities of "me" vs. "us" are reflected in social media use.

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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America's delayed backlash to globalization

Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping.
Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping. Photo: Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

The backlash to globalization is coming "at exactly the wrong time," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: President Trump's new tariffs, on steel and aluminum and most recently against China, are working to "re-set the terms of the global economy," the NYT reports. But the globalization the world is seeing today is not focused on goods and services, but "greater connectivity and communication."