Feb 20, 2018

The dwindling pool of Americans eligible for military service

U.S. Army soldiers line up. Photo: Matej Divizna / Getty Images

Close to 75% of young Americans, ages 17 to 24, are not eligible for the military due to health issues or criminal backgrounds, Politico's Bryan Bender reports, citing government data. That's 24 million out of 34 million individuals.

The bottom line: Rising rates of obesity and asthma as well as falling rates of high school graduation in certain cities are shrinking the pool of Americans eligible for military service. It's an obstacle for President Trump's defense plan, which includes recruiting "tens of thousands of new soldiers, sailors, pilots and cyber specialists over the next five years" to build up the military, writes Bender.

"We all have this image in our mind of this hearty American citizen, scrappy, that can do anything ... That image we keep in our heads is no longer accurate."
— Retired Army Lt. Gen. Tom Spoehr, who has co-authored a paper on the recruiting crisis, told Politico.

By the numbers:

  • "The new budget calls for increasing the size of the military by 25,900 people through October 2019 and by a total of 56,600 by 2023 — all mostly active-duty troops."
  • The obesity rate among younger adults is about 32%, per CDC data.
  • High school graduation rates hit an all-time high of 84.1% in 2017, but there are still major cities and states reporting much lower rates, such as 70.7% in Montgomery, Alabama and 51.3% in Albany, Oregon, Spoehr notes. Young people must have high school degrees or GEDs to serve.
  • And unemployment sits at 4%, which makes military recruiting difficult.

Go deeper

Private equity returns fell behind stocks over the past decade

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. private equity returns fell just below S&P 500 returns for the 10-year period ending last June, according to a report released Monday morning by Bain & Company.

Why it matters: Private equity markets itself as beating public markets over long-term time horizons, and usually providing an illiquidity premium to boot. These new performance figures not only dent such claims, but provide fresh ammunition to critics of public pension investment in private equity funds.

Why Apple may move to open iOS

Photo illustration: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Apple may finally allow iPhone owners to set email or browsing apps other than Apple's own as their preferred defaults, according to a Bloomberg report from last week.

The big picture: Customers have long clamored for the ability to choose their preferred apps, and now Apple, like other big tech companies, finds itself under increased scrutiny over anything perceived as anticompetitive.