The different ways your health care costs are going up - Axios
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The different ways your health care costs are going up

We've spent so much time talking about Affordable Care Act costs this year that it's easy to forget what most people are actually paying for health care — the 156 million Americans who get their health coverage through the workplace. Turns out, most of us aren't seeing sky-high premium increases. But it's also worth remembering that deductibles matter too — because that's what we pay out of pocket before insurance kicks in.

Data: Kaiser Family Foundation; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Take a look at these two graphics from Axios datavisuals genius Chris Canipe. The premium increases between 2010 and 2016 weren't that bad — they're single digits each year, and just add up over time. But you can see some big increases in deductibles, especially in point-of-service plans and HMOs.

Why it matters: That's a big reason why people feel their health care costs going up, because it means they're paying more out of pocket. And when prescription drug prices rise, they're more likely to feel it directly.

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John Kelly told incorrect story about Florida congresswoman

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly takes questions during a surprise damage-control appearance at the daily briefing. (AP's Susan Walsh)

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly incorrectly told reporters from the White House podium that Florida Rep. Frederica Wilson claimed to have "got the money" for a new FBI building in Miramar, Florida at its dedication in 2015. The Sun-Sentinel unearthed video of Wilson's speech at the dedication event, where she took credit for securing quick approval for naming the building after deceased FBI agents but never mentioned funding.

Timing: Kelly's misrepresentation of what happened comes as the White House's current feud with Wilson and the Gold Star widow of a soldier killed in Niger began over President Trump's alleged thoughtless choice of words.

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Body cams fail to curb police aggression

A photo of the screen during the trial of Milwaukee police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown who shot and killed 23-year-old Sylville Smith after a routine traffic stop last August. Photo: Milwaukee Police Department / AP

Police officers in D.C. who were given body cameras were just as likely to use force and receive civilian complaints as those who did not wear cameras, according to a newly released study of more than 1,000 police officers over seven months by the Lab @ D.C.

Why it matters: Previous studies bolstered the idea that body cameras were extremely effective for cutting back the use of force and civilian complaints. This led to body cam companies like Axon and Watchguard selling hundreds of thousands of body cameras across the country — Watchguard even filed for an IPO yesterday. Now this latest study calls into question the real impact body cameras have in changing aggressive policing culture.

On the other hand: Even if body cams are ineffective at keeping law enforcement from using force, they still provide a layer of accountability and have provided useful evidence in police shooting cases.

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Most Americans don't have much confidence in Trump's legacy

Photo: Evan Vucci / AP

Most Americans, 58%, don't have high expectations for President Trump's legacy, according to a new Marist Poll. The poll found that 42% of those surveyed believe Trump will be remembered as one of the worst presidents in U.S. history and 16% believe he is a below-average leader.

Why it matters: "Deep into his first year as president, Donald Trump's less than stellar approval rating has lowered expectations about how history will judge him," Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion, said in a statement. "For history to treat him kinder, he will have to up his game."

The findings:

  • Combined parties: 58% believe he will be either the worst or at least a below-average president; 19% see him as an average president; 11% think he will be seen as above average; and, 7% believe he will be seen one of the best leaders.
  • Among Republicans: 22% believe Trump will be remembered as one of the best presidents, and 26% think above average. 31% think his legacy will be an average one. Meanwhile, 83% of Republicans either strongly approve or approve of Trump's performance so far.
  • Among Democrats: 70% think Trump will be considered one of the worst U.S. presidents. Meanwhile, 7% either strongly approve or approve of Trump's performance so far.
Methodology:
  • The poll includes a survey of 1,093 adults conducted Oct. 15–17. The margin of error was 3%.
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McCain's new memoir to be released in April

Matt Rourke / AP

Senator John McCain is writing a memoir titled "The Restless Wave: Good Times, Just Causes, Great Fights, and Other Appreciations," which will be published by Simon & Shuster's this coming April, according to the AP. The Senator received a brain cancer prognosis in July, five months after signing on for the book deal, and has become an emboldened critic of President Trump.

Why it matters: The memoir has already changed its focus since McCain's diagnosis, from international issues to more of a reflective work on McCain's experience and career, per AP. Originally, the title was slated to be: "It's
Always Darkest Before It's Totally Black." "This memoir will be about what matters most to him, and I hope it will be regarded as the work of an American hero," said Jonathan Karp, president and publisher of Simon & Schuster's.

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Facebook employees fret about the company's Russia problem

Facebook's developer's conference earlier this year. Photo: Noah Berger / AP

BuzzFeed News' Charlie Warzel finds that employees at Facebook feel the company doesn't deserve to be the focus of the deepening crisis of Russian election meddling online, especially after critics previously hit the company for censoring content. "There are lots inside thinking, 'We're the victims,'" one source told him, and that the company is "just a battlefield in a greater misinformation campaign."

Go deeper: The whole story is worth reading to get a sense of what the mood is like inside the secretive company.

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After dropping for 3 years, uninsured rate rising

A doctor and patient at a health clinic in Oregon. Photo: Gosia Wozniacka / AP

After consistent declines over the past three years, the rate of U.S. adults without health insurance has begun to rise, according to new data from Gallup. One year ago, the uninsured rate was 10.9%, down from 18% in early 2013. Now, it has ticked back up to 12.3%, the highest percentage recorded since 2014.

Why it matters: The steep drop in the uninsured rate was one of the Affordable Care Act's biggest successes since it went into full effect. If that's being reversed now, expect a lot of debate over how much is because of the months of repeal efforts and the Trump administration’s vocal opposition to the law.

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Trump interviewed U.S. attorney nominees in New York

Photo: Carolyn Kaster / AP

President Trump has personally interviewed at least two candidates to fill the open U.S. attorney vacancies in New York, reports Politico: Geoffrey Berman for the U.S. attorney post in the Southern District of New York, and Ed McNally for the Eastern District of New York.

The interviews are unusual for a president, and have raised concerns among critics of potential conflicts of interest, as U.S. attorneys are supposed to operate independently from the president. Matthew Miller, former Department of Justice spokesman under the Obama administration said Thursday that Obama never interviewed a U.S. attorney candidate during his two terms.

The White House's defense: "These are individuals that the president nominates and the Senate confirms under Article II of the Constitution," a WH official told Politico. "We realize Senate Democrats would like to reduce this President's constitutional powers. But he and other presidents before him and after may talk to individuals nominated to positions within the executive branch."

  • Preet Bharara, the former U.S. attorney in the Southern District of New York who was fired in March, tweeted Wednesday: "It is neither normal nor advisable for Trump to personally interview candidates for U.S. Attorney positions, especially the one in Manhattan."
  • And this isn't the first time Trump has done this. Politico points to Senate Judiciary documents that reveal Trump met with Jessie Liu, the candidate for U.S. attorney in the District of Columbia, earlier this year. That meeting raised questions from Democrats in particular, though she was later confirmed.
  • "For him to be interviewing candidates for that prosecutor who may in turn consider whether to bring indictments involving him and his administration seems to smack of political interference," Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) told Politico.
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Retailers can't find qualified workers

A now hiring sign is shown in the widow of an Express in NYC. Photo: Mark Lenihan / AP

Staffing companies that work with some of America's biggest retailers say that the industry is struggling to attract quality workers at both the store associate and management levels, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: It's good news for workers that an historically good labor market is generally enabling folks to eschew jobs that don't pay well or offer competitive pay. But it couldn't come at a worst time for the traditional retail industry, which will struggle to differentiate itself from cheap e-commerce if it can't afford to hire quality salespeople.

  • Melissa Hassett of ManpowerGroup Solutions, whose clients include Lowe's, Pep Boys, and Staples, says that retailers are having particular difficulty "hiring is the lower level, the seasonal or entry-level employees," because applicants are balking at the low pay and unpredictable schedules typically offered by the industry.
  • The struggles of traditional retailers of late has also limited their ability to pay competitive bonuses for retaining " talented regional managers or heads of business lines."
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Trump attributes U.K. crime spike to terrorism. The report doesn't

President Trump and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May at the G20 summit in July. Photo: John MacDougall / Pool Photo via AP

In a morning tweet, President Trump tied increasing crime rates in the United Kingdom to the "spread of Radical Islamic terror" after the country suffered a series of terror attacks in 2017:

Fact check: While the U.K.'s Office of National Statistics annual crime report did indeed mark a 13% year-on-year increase in crime, it barely mentions terrorism. The portion of the report likely to cause more concern across the pond: a notable increase in violent crimes like knife attacks and sexual assaults over the past year, per The Guardian.

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Chicago considers ride-hailing tax to fund public transit

A car with both Uber and Lyft signs. Photo: Richard Vogel / AP

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel proposed on Wednesday a tax on ride-hailing companies, the revenue from which would be exclusively invested into the city's public transit. The proposal is for a a $0.15 fee in 2018, increasing to $0.20 in 2019, added on top of an existing fee of $0.52. If it passes, this will be the first ride-hailing fee in a U.S. city dedicated to a city's public transit.

Why it matters: Questions over ride-hailing's impact on public transit have persisted over the years. Last week, researchers published a study that showed that services like Uber and Lyft have led to a 6% decline in public transit use by respondents. Still, the companies have continued to say that they want to be a partner to public transit systems in cities.

From Lyft:

We appreciate the Mayor working to build a sustainable future for ridesharing drivers and passengers in Chicago and look forward to continue collaborating on providing safe, convenient and affordable transportation options for the city.

From Uber:

When safe and affordable rides are available across every neighborhood -- whether it's by train, bus, or rideshare -- Chicagoans can get to their jobs or family obligations without having to own a car. At Uber we believe that the future of urban transportation will be a mix of public transit and ridesharing, and that by encouraging residents to use a variety of options, we can all ride together to build a better Chicago.