Aug 10, 2017

The different ways your health care costs are going up

We've spent so much time talking about Affordable Care Act costs this year that it's easy to forget what most people are actually paying for health care — the 156 million Americans who get their health coverage through the workplace. Turns out, most of us aren't seeing sky-high premium increases. But it's also worth remembering that deductibles matter too — because that's what we pay out of pocket before insurance kicks in.

Data: Kaiser Family Foundation; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Take a look at these two graphics from Axios datavisuals genius Chris Canipe. The premium increases between 2010 and 2016 weren't that bad — they're single digits each year, and just add up over time. But you can see some big increases in deductibles, especially in point-of-service plans and HMOs.

Why it matters: That's a big reason why people feel their health care costs going up, because it means they're paying more out of pocket. And when prescription drug prices rise, they're more likely to feel it directly.

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