Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Republican Congressional leaders yesterday signaled plans to move forward with President Trump's planned border wall, estimated to cost between $12 billion and $15 billion. That's well below many outside estimates of the construction cost (let alone maintenance), but is significantly higher than what Trump himself has said in the past.

September 2015: $4 billion

"Let's say the wall cost $4 billion. You know, they say $10 billion. That means $4 billion if you know what you're doing and the $4 billion will be much bigger, much better, much stronger than the $10 billion. Believe me. Oh, do I know how to build? Greatest. One of the greats." ― Donald Trump

November 2015: $6 billion to $7 billion

"The wall is going to cost $6 billion or $7 billion if I build it. If somebody else builds it, it's going to cost $20 billion." ― Donald Trump

February 2016: $8 billion

"The wall is probably $8 billion, which is a tiny fraction of the money that we lose with Mexico... I'm taking price per square foot and price per square, you know, per mile, and it's a very simple calculation." ― Donald Trump

Two weeks later: $10 billion to $12 billion

"Now, the wall is $10 billion to $12 billion, if I do it. If these guys do it, it'll end up costing $200 billion." ― Donald Trump

Last night: up to $14 billion

"I think a lot of people are in favor of securing the border on both sides, yes. But the estimates are $8 billion to $14 billion..." Greta Van SustenPaul Ryan: "Some are, right." ― Paul Ryan

The very same day: up to $15 billion

"Roughly ummm" ― Mitch McConnell

"$12 to $15 billion" ― Paul Ryan

"Yeah, $12 to $15 billion. So we intend to address the wall issue ourselves." ― Mitch McConnell

February 10: nearly $22 billion

Reuters got a hold of the internal Homeland Security document projecting it will cost $21.6 billion, and take 3.5 years to build.

Editor's Note: this post was updated on February 11th to add the latest Reuters report.

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