Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Axios on your phone

Get breaking news and scoops on the go with the Axios app.

Download for free.

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Port Authority police officers test new scanning technology to detect explosives in New York City. Photo: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

Los Angeles will be implementing body scanning technology to its mass transit systems, the New York Times reported this week, becoming the first city to do so.

Why it matters: Jay Stanley, senior policy analyst at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), told Axios "the technology revolution that we're seeing in other areas is definitely affecting law enforcement, and all too often these technologies are being deployed without telling — let alone asking — the affected communities."

Facial recognition

Amazon is selling facial recognition technology, called Rekognition, to police departments claiming it helps "identify persons of interest against a collection of millions of faces in real-time," per Wired.

  • Police in Orlando have been using it to run "real-time facial recognition on a network of cameras throughout the city," The Verge reports.

The other side: Georgetown University's Center on Privacy and Technology reported in 2016 that this technology affects more than 117 million American adults, yet "[n]o state has passed a law comprehensively regulating police face recognition." The technology is "out of control" in many cases around the country and will disproportionately affect black citizens.

Body scanners

Chief security and law enforcement officer for the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Alex Wiggins, told the NYT: "We're looking specifically for weapons that have the ability to cause a mass casualty event."

  • Spokesman for the L.A. Metro, Dave Sotero, told the Times that most people "won't even know they're being scanned."

The other side: Stanley told Axios the police "are basically doing a search of you, and you can't do a search of somebody without reasonable suspicion under the Fourth Amendment."

Body cameras

Police departments across the country now have officers wearing body cameras, meant to both hold officers accountable and protect them from unfair or false accusations.

  • Police Chief Peter Newsham of the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington told the New York Times last year that the cameras have helped the communities trust officers more, assisted in training, resulted in more accurate investigations and more.

The other side: The ACLU is concerned about cameras' "potential to invade privacy, their risk of being reduced to just another tool for government mass surveillance...and their risk of becoming a propaganda tool."

Drones

Technology development company Axon and drone-maker DJI announced a partnership in June this year to sell drones to law enforcement agencies around the world.

  • Drones are being used all over the country — the Wrightsville Beach Fire Department is testing them to assist in water rescues, and police in North Carolina used a drone to locate an elderly woman.
  • L.A. County Sheriff Department Special Operations Division Commander Jack Ewell told the Atlantic in June that the technology "is just a lifesaver in law-enforcement work."

The other side: The public experienced something similar in 2016, when a small aircraft with wide-angle cameras flew above Baltimore, taking footage of 30 square miles and archiving it while the public had no idea, Bloomberg reported.

"This is where the rubber hits the road. The technology has finally arrived, and Big Brother, which everyone has always talked about, is finally here."
— Jay Stanley to Bloomberg, about the Baltimore aerial surveillance

Go deeper

Educators face fines, harassment over critical race theory

People talk before the start of a rally against critical race theory being taught in schools at the Loudoun County Government center in Leesburg, Va. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Elementary school teachers, administrators and college professors are facing fines, physical threats, and fear of firing because of an organized push from the right to remove classroom discussions of systemic racism.

Why it matters: Moves to ban critical race theory are raising free speech concerns amid an absence of consistent parameters about what teachings are in or out of bounds.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

1 dead after pickup truck hits Pride spectators in Florida

Police investigate the scene where a pickup truck drove into a crowd of people at a Pride parade in Wilton Manors, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Jason Koerner/Getty Images

A driver in a pickup truck hit spectators at a Pride festival in Wilton Manors, Florida, killing a man and leaving another person hospitalized Saturday, authorities said.

Details: Fort Lauderdale Mayor Dean Trantalis told reporters police had "apprehended the driver" and that the vehicle missed a parade car carrying Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) "by inches."

Updated 9 hours ago - Sports

Uganda Olympic team member tests positive for COVID in Tokyo

The Uganda National boxing team's Catherine Nanziri (L) and others arrive for check-in at Entebbe international airport in Wakiso, Uganda on Friday, ahead of their departure to participate in the Tokyo Olympic Games. Photo: Badru Katumba/AFP via Getty Images

A Uganda Olympic team member tested positive for COVID-19 upon arrival in Japan late Saturday, officials said.

Why it matters: Japan's government has faced criticism for vowing to host the Tokyo Games next month as coronavirus cases rise. The Ugandan team is the second to arrive in Japan after the Australian women's softball players, and this is the first COVID-19 infection detected among the Olympic athletes, Al Jazeera notes.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!