Apr 28, 2017

The big losers if Trump stops health insurance subsidies

It's looking like the Affordable Care Act insurer subsidies aren't going to be funded through the upcoming spending bill. This means that until a pending court case on their legality is resolved, the Trump administration is going to have to decide whether to keep paying them. Here's where people would be impacted the most if the administration stops paying the subsidies.

Data: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Map: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

How it works: The subsidies are paid directly to insurers, but then insurers by law must pass them on to low-income enrollees by reducing their deductibles and out-of-pocket spending.

What could happen: If the subsidies aren't funded, insurers will likely either pull out of marketplaces altogether or significantly raise premiums.

To note: Most states with the highest percentage of enrollees receiving subsidies are traditionally red states, and many are in the south.

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Farmers hoping for more "Trump money" in 2020

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

U.S. farmers have been given a bit of a lifeline by the "phase one" U.S.-China trade deal, but without concrete specifics on what China will purchase there remains some worry about how they will be able to support themselves and their farms in 2020.

Background: Farmers had a rough 2019, even with a hefty subsidy package provided to them by the Trump administration as relief from the trade war.

The U.S. medical administrative bloat

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

In 2017, U.S. insurers and providers spent $2,497 per capita on administration — nearly 5 times more than the $551 spent per capita in Canada, which has a much more heavily socialized system, according to a new study in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Why it matters: We're all paying this through our premiums, out-of-pocket costs and taxes.

Go deeperArrowJan 8, 2020

China hits pause on electric vehicle subsidy cuts

A Tesla Model 3 in Shanghai. Photo: Costfoto / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

China announced it will "not make significant cuts" this year to subsidies on new energy vehicles including electric vehicles, via Reuters, "signaling that its policy will remain relatively stable, state media quoted the country’s industry ministry as saying on Saturday."

Why it matters: EV sales in China, which has the world's largest auto market, dropped sharply after the Chinese government significantly cut industry subsidies in July.

Go deeperArrowJan 13, 2020