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The 20 most-blocked keywords in ad campaigns

Workers install a #VegasStrong banner on the Mandalay Bay hotel and casino Monday, Oct. 16. Photo: John Locher / AP

An analysis of the 20 most blocked keywords monthly from January to October of this year via data from Integral Ad Science shows that marketers are most concerned about gruesome, violent content, like mass shootings, bombings and explosions.

Why it matters: Bad actors abusing the open web with terrorism content and violence are not only challenging our conventional notion of the benefits of the internet, but also forcing regulators to revisit outdated Internet policies.

Data: Axios analysis of Integral Ad Science monthly blocked keywords; Note: Other includes drug and profanity; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Keywords blocking marijuana seem to have decreased in the ranks amid crises flooding the news cycle, like multiple terror attacks, bombings, and mass shootings.

References to domestic related events, like "Las Vegas," "Mandalay Bay," and "Charlottesville" were commonly blocked in August, September and October.

Go deeper: Last week, Axios' Kim Hart and I wrote about America waking up to the dark side of the internet.

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Where Trump's steel and aluminum trade war will hit first

Note: Includes only products under the "Iron & Steel & Ferroalloy" and "Alumina & Aluminum & Processing" NAICS commodity classifications. Data: Census Bureau; Chart: Chris Canipe and Lazaro Gamio / Axios

The Trump administration has begun imposing tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum, but several countries are exempted temporarily until May 1, as shown in the chart above. The administration may still apply quotas on exempted countries to prevent a flood of foreign steel and aluminum in the U.S. market, per the White House.

Why it matters: After railroading past a number of his advisors, Trump announced the tariffs on imports of steel (at 25%) and aluminum (at 10%) earlier this month, citing national security concerns. But with the exemption noted above, the tariffs won't carry major bite, at least to start.

Alexi McCammond 6 hours ago
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Trump signs spending bill despite veto threat

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump announced that he has signed the $1.3 trillion spending bill that passed Congress last night "as a matter of national security," citing the bill's increase in defense spending, even though he threatened to veto earlier today. "My highest duty is to keep America safe," Trump said. He said he's disappointed in most of the bill.

Key quote: "I will never sign another bill like this again. I'm not going to do it again. Nobody read it. It's only hours old."