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An abortion rights activist holds a sign in support of Planned Parenthood at a rally at the Texas State Capitol on Sept. 11 in Austin, Texas. Photo: Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

A Texas state judge issued an injunction on Monday blocking anti-abortion group Texas Right for Life from enforcing the state's new law against Planned Parenthood in Texas.

Why it matters: Texas' restrictive new law, which bars abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, incentivizes people to sue anyone suspected of helping a pregnant person obtain an abortion — and awards at least $10,000 to plaintiffs who succeed.

  • The injunction, which applies only to Texas Right for Life and its affiliates, prevents them from suing Planned Parenthood for possible violations of the abortion ban.
    • Issued in Austin by Texas District Court Judge Karin Crump, the order will stay in effect until at least April 2022, when a trial on the merits of the case is expected.
  • It replaces a temporary restraining order granted to Planned Parenthood affiliates last week and "is part of a larger — and piecemeal — approach by abortion rights advocates to try to blunt the effect of the law," CNN writes.

What they're saying: "We are relieved that ... our providers and health care workers will now have some protection from frivolous suits as litigation against this blatantly unconstitutional law continues," Helene Krasnoff, Planned Parenthood's vice president for public policy litigation and law, said in a statement.

  • "Desperate Texans are being forced to carry pregnancies against their will or flee the state to seek constitutionally protected care, and brave health care providers and staff across the state are working hard to provide care within the law while facing surveillance, harassment, and threats."
  • "This temporary injunction is an important step, but it is not enough relief," Krasnoff added, emphasizing the group's plan to keep fighting.

The other side: "The injunction only prevents the named parties from filing or assisting others in lawsuits against Planned Parenthood abortion facilities," Texas Right for Life said in a statement.

  • "Other citizens are legally authorized to sue Planned Parenthood if their abortionists violated the Texas Heartbeat Act, and Texas Right to Life is legally authorized to sue others who might aid or abet abortions."
  • "Thus, today’s ruling ultimately has no effect on the Texas Heartbeat Act or the risk the abortion industry is taking if they violate" the law, the group said.

Go deeper

North Carolina judges strike down state’s voter ID law as racially biased

Photo: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

North Carolina judges ruled Friday that the state's latest photo identification voter law is racially biased and discriminates against Black voters, violating their equal protections.

Why it matters: This is the second time North Carolina has had a voter ID law overturned by the courts. In 2016, a federal appeals court blocked a similar 2013 law because it violated the Constitution and targeted Black voters with "almost surgical precision."

Mike Allen, author of AM
1 hour ago - Technology

Axios interview: Facebook to try for more transparency

Nick Clegg last year. Photo: Matthew Sobocinski/USA Today via Reuters

Nick Clegg, Facebook's vice president of global affairs, tells me the company will try to provide more data to outside researchers to scrutinize the health of activity on Facebook and Instagram, following The Wall Street Journal's brutal look at internal documents.

Driving the news: Clegg didn't say that in his public response to the series. So I called him to push for what Facebook will actually do differently given the new dangers raised by The Journal.

The Exvangelicals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Even as evangelicals maintain their position as the most popular religion in the U.S., a movement of self-described "exvangelicals" is breaking away, using social media to engage tens of thousands of former faithful.

The big picture: Donald Trump's presidency, as well as movements around LGBTQ rights, #MeToo and Black Lives Matter, drew more Americans into evangelical churches while also pushing some existing members away.