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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The coronavirus pandemic's forced work-from-home phenomenon cuts across education levels, race and gender, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

By the numbers: Looking at the latest figures from June, more educated workers were more likely to have teleworked because of the pandemic. A measly 5% of workers with less than a high school diploma worked from home versus 54% of workers with a college degree or higher.

  • Women were more likely (36%) than men (27%) to have worked from home because of the pandemic.
  • 49% of Asian people teleworked because of the pandemic — higher than white people (31%), Black people (26%), and Hispanics (21%).

Go deeper

New state unemployment filings fall to 787,000

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

First-time applications for unemployment fell last week, according to Department of Labor data released on Thursday.

Between the lines: The overall number of Americans relying on unemployment also fell to a still-staggering 23 million. But there are continued signs of labor market strain, with more people shifting to an unemployment program designed for the long-term jobless.

Justice Department drops insider trading inquiry against Sen. Richard Burr

Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) walking through the Senate Subway in the U.S. Capitol in December 2020. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Department of Justice told Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) on Tuesday that it will not move forward with insider trading charges against him.

Why it matters: The decision, first reported by the New York Times, effectively ends the DOJ's investigation into the senator's stock sell-off that occurred after multiple lawmakers were briefed about the coronavirus' potential economic toll. Burr subsequently stepped down as chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth-quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.