Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Thousands of teachers on strike at the Oklahoma state capitol. Photo: J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Teachers from six states across the country have gone on strike in 2018 in protest of their working conditions, even at times in defiance of state laws.

Why it matters: Teachers have seen wage decreases across the country, yet they're still shouldering the weight of taking care of their classrooms and paying for supplies without reimbursement. This has launched a national movement among teachers from private and public schools alike who are fighting for more money, better budgets, and less red tape.

By the numbers
Costs rise while salaries shrink

While student costs are rising for teachers, 39 states have decreased funding for instructional materials.

Expand chart
Data: Urban Institute; Cartogram: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

In 11 states, plus Washington, D.C., teacher salaries have been declining since 2010, while their cost of living has increased.

Expand chart
Data: National Center for Education Statistics, The Council for Community and Economic Research; Note: Estimated average annual salary of teachers in public elementary and secondary schools, adjusted for inflation; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios
What we're hearing

Teachers believe they can make a change because of the power in their votes. And it isn't a coincidence that strikes are being held during an election year.

A lot of legislators' jobs are in trouble right now.
— Noah Karvelis, organizer of Arizona Educators United, tells Axios.

Karvelis told Axios that teachers are watching the way legislators vote and aren't satisfied. Meanwhile, the thousands of teachers who are disgruntled are among potential candidates in support of education.

  • Some teachers are prepared to run for seats in Arizona, Karvelis said.
  • In Kentucky at least 39 current and former teachers are running for seats in the state legislature in its upcoming primary, per an AP report
  • Oklahoma teacher Amanda Jeffers had no intention of running for office before the walkout, she told the AP, but has since changed her mind.
Teachers want to change restrictive laws

It's difficult for several teachers unionize because of right-to-work laws that don't require states to pay union dues.

  • So they strike; however, striking for teachers is illegal in all but 12 states. But even if it's legal, striking could risk their pensions or jobs.

The big picture: More teachers will continue to mobilize until the numbers swing in their favor, like teachers in North Carolina did on Wednesday. The growing trend of walking out of the classroom appears to show no signs of stopping, as more teachers feel emboldened by their peers and begin to push for change in their own education systems.

Go deeper

Biden's Day 1 challenges: Systemic racism

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Kirsty O'Connor (PA Images)/Getty Images

Advocates are pushing President-elect Biden to tackle systemic racism with a Day 1 agenda that includes ending the detention of migrant children and expanding DACA, announcing a Justice Department investigation of rogue police departments and returning some public lands to Indigenous tribes.

Why it matters: Biden has said the fight against systemic racism will be one of the top goals of his presidency — but the expectations may be so high that he won't be able to meet them.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Most Americans are still vulnerable to the coronavirus

Adapted from Bajema, et al., 2020, "Estimated SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence in the US as of September 2020"; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

As of September, the vast majority of Americans did not have coronavirus antibodies, according to a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Why it matters: As the coronavirus spreads rapidly throughout most of the country, most people remain vulnerable to it.

Trump set to appear at Pennsylvania GOP hearing on voter fraud claims

President Trumpat the White House on Tuesday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump is due to join his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Wednesday at a Republican-led state Senate Majority Policy Committee hearing to discuss alleged election irregularities.

Why it matters: This would be his first trip outside of the DMV since Election Day and comes shortly after GSA ascertained the results, formally signing off on a transition to President-elect Biden.