Douglas Wigdor. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Douglas Wigdor, whose firm has represented plaintiffs in high-profile discrimination cases, announced Friday that he was no longer representing Tara Reade, a former Senate staffer who has accused Joe Biden of sexually assaulting her in 1993.

The state of play: While Wigdor did not provide a reason behind his firm's decision, he did say that the move is "by no means a reflection" on the veracity of her allegations.

  • Some of Wigdor's most notable cases have taken on Fox News, including former top host Bill O'Reilly, and Harvey Weinstein.
  • Despite his caseload, Wigdor has also garnered press for being a staunch conservative and supporter of President Trump.
  • Biden has flatly denied Reade's allegations.

The big picture: The development comes a day after California defense attorneys said they are reviewing cases in which Reade testified as an expert on domestic violence, following concerns that she misrepresented her academic qualifications.

What they're saying:

"Our Firm no longer represents Tara Reade. Our decision, made on May 20, is by no means a reflection on whether then-Senator Biden sexually assaulted Ms. Reade. On that point, our view which is the same view held by the majority of Americans, according to a Harvard CAPS-Harris Poll has not changed. We also believe to a large extent Ms. Reade has been subjected to a double standard in terms of the media coverage she has received.
"Much of what has been written about Ms. Reade is not probative of whether then-Senator Biden sexually assaulted her, but rather is intended to victim-shame and attack her credibility on unrelated and irrelevant matters. We genuinely wish Ms. Reade well and hope that she, as a survivor, is treated fairly. We have and will continue to represent survivors regardless of their alleged predator’s status or politics."
— Wigdor's full statement on the decision

Go deeper ... Timeline: Tara Reade's sexual assault allegations against Joe Biden

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