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A Bradley Fighting Vehicle, with the Lincoln Memorial in the background. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

For the first time since the U.S. defeated Iraq in the original Iraq War of 1991, two M1 Abrams tanks will roll through D.C. on Thursday as part of a military parade requested by President Trump.

Why it matters: "Pentagon officials have long been reluctant to parade tanks, missiles and other weapons through the nation’s capital like the authoritarian leaders of North Korea and China," NYT notes.

  • "But Mr. Trump believes that the inclusion of tanks and other weapons ... would help to transform the capital city’s annual event into the kind of military celebration he has long wanted."
People pose in front of a Bradley Fighting Vehicle and the Lincoln Memorial. Photo: Alastair Pike/AFP/Getty Images

Driving the news: Local officials are concerned that the heavy vehicles (Abrams tanks can reach 70 tons) could damage local roads — especially around the National Mall.

  • D.C.'s City Council to Trump, via tweet: "We have said it before, and we’ll say it again: Tanks, but no tanks.”
  • Trump on Monday: "You've got to be pretty careful with the tanks because the roads have a tendency not to like to carry heavy tanks, so we have to put them in certain areas."
Two M1A2 Abrams tanks (the closest ones) and other military vehicles sit on guarded rail cars in D.C. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Another point of concern: "The National Park Service is diverting nearly $2.5 million in entrance and recreation fees primarily intended to improve parks across the country to cover costs" of the parade, the Washington Post reports.

  • "By comparison, according to former Park Service deputy director Denis P. Galvin, the entire Fourth of July celebration on the Mall typically costs the agency about $2 million."
  • WashPost: "The cost of a military parade Trump wanted to stage last year was about $92 million, including $50 million in Defense Department expenses, defense officials said at the time."
One of two Bradley Fighting Vehicles is parked next to the Lincoln Memorial. Photo: Andrew Harnik

Go deeper

Updated 33 mins ago - Axios Twin Cities

In photos: Thousands rally for George Floyd ahead of Derek Chauvin's trial

Demonstrators on March 7 outside the Hennepin County Government Center, where the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, charged with murdering George Floyd, will begin in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Thousands of protesters marched through Minneapolis' streets Sunday, urging justice for George Floyd on the eve of the start of former police officer Derek Chauvin's trial over the 46-year-old's death, per AFP.

The big picture: Chauvin faces charges for second-degree murder and manslaughter over Floyd's death last May, which ignited massive nationwide and global protests against racism and for police reform. His trial is due to start Monday, with jury selection procedures.

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Pfizer CEO feels "liberated" after taking COVID vaccine

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla. Photo: "Axios on HBO"

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla tells "Axios on HBO" that he recently received his first of two doses of the company's coronavirus vaccine.

Why it matters: Bourla told CNBC in December that company polling found that one of the most effective ways to increase confidence in the vaccine was to have the CEO take it.

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4 hours ago - Economy & Business

Ripple CEO: SEC lawsuit is "bad for crypto" in the U.S.

Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse tells "Axios on HBO" that if his company loses a lawsuit brought by U.S. regulators, it would put the country at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to cryptocurrencies.

Between the lines: The SEC in December sued Ripple, and Garlinghouse personally, for allegedly selling over $1.3 billion in unregistered securities. Ripple's response is that its cryptocurrency, called XRP, didn't require registration because it's an asset rather than a security.