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A tanker truck drives into thousands of people on 35W North Bound highway during a protests over the death of George Floyd on Sunday in Minneapolis. Photo: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A man who was arrested after authorities claimed he sped toward protesters in Minneapolis with a tanker truck Sunday was released from jail without charges on Tuesday pending further investigation, according to the Hennepin County Attorney's Office.

What's happening: State officials said on Monday the incident didn't appear to be intentional, the Star Tribune reports. Public safety commissioner John Harrington said the driver may not have realized the Interstate 35W Bridge was closed before he nearly struck protesters and sent others running.

  • “We don’t have any information that makes this seem like this was an intentional act,” Harrington said. “It wasn’t that he went around the barricades to get to the protest.”

What's next: Investigators are gathering more information to decide whether to charge the driver.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper

17-year-old charged with 6 counts in killing of 2 people during Kenosha protests

Protestors confront police in front of the Kenosha County Courthouse on August 25. Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Wisconsin prosecutors have charged 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse on six counts — including first degree reckless homicide and first degree intentional homicide — related to the shooting deaths of two people and wounding of one during protests in Kenosha on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Rittenhouse could face a mandatory life sentence if convicted on first-degree intentional homicide, according to AP.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

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