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Photo: Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty

Inequities in education funding require a hard look as students of color struggle with lack of access to high-quality education, National Education Association (NEA) president Becky Pringle said at a virtual Axios event Tuesday.

Why it matters: Systemic racism is embedded in the structures of American education, and it sets up a stark divide between white students and students of color, who often do not share access to the same resources.

The big picture: The country’s most affluent schools are often a mile away from the country’s poorest, Pringle said. And at these public schools, a majority of students are often students of color.

  • “When you take a look, you will not see AP courses. You will not see counselors and nurses. You will see overcrowded classrooms. You will see ventilation systems that are outdated, crumbling buildings, things that tell the students themselves that adults in our systems do not care about them.”
  • 60 million students — 25% of all students — already lacked access to digital tools and online learning before the pandemic, according to Pringle. COVID-19 has widened that gap.
  • Studies show that increases in per-pupil spending lessen the chance of adult poverty for low-income students.

Go deeper: The public school funding divide

Go deeper

Nov 26, 2020 - Health

Standardized testing becomes another pandemic victim

Photo: Edmund D. Fountain for The Washington Post via Getty

National standardized reading and math tests have been pushed from next year to 2022, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) announced Wednesday.

Why it matters: There’s mounting national evidence that students are suffering major setbacks this year, with a surge in the number of failing grades.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.

1 hour ago - Podcasts

Faces of COVID creator on telling the stories of those we've lost

America yesterday lost 2,762 people to COVID-19, per the CDC, bringing the total pandemic toll to 272,525. That's more than the population of Des Moines, Iowa. Or Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Or Toledo, Ohio.

Axios Re:Cap speaks with Alex Goldstein, creator of the @FacesofCOVID Twitter account, about sharing the stories behind the statistics.