Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Tony Avelar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Symantec announced Sunday that it's opening up for its customers the use of advanced machine learning tools that helped the antivirus firm do pioneering research on state-sponsored cyber threats.

Why it matters: The tool being offered to the public has ties to some heavy-duty research. Alejandro Borgia, Symantec's vice president of product management, said the newly-public "Targeted Attack Analytics" software was key in the firm's work connecting the Wannacry ransomware to the same attackers that hacked Sony — which the U.S. government confirmed had been North Korean operations. Borgia also also credited the TAA software with Symantec's influential work on the "Dragonfly" energy sector espionage campaign.

The details: TAA will analyze telemetric data from Symantec clients and report red flags to clients automatically. Until now, TAA had only been used as a tool to assist Symantec employees — not as an automated detection system. "We've been able to identify around 10 attackers a week before they've done any damage," said Borgia.

  • TAA is designed to search for what the industry sometimes calls advanced persistent threats — targeted attacks from well-funded actors. "By design, they're the hardest attackers to discover," said Borgia.
  • It analyzes everything from how network users traverse a network to scripted commands that are run.
  • Borgia said the software was trained to mimic Symantec's internal research team. They knew it was effective, he said, when it began to identify threats that the researchers themselves have never seen before.

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
5 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.