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Andrew Harnik / AP

Republican Sen. Susan Collins announced this morning she will remain in the U.S. Senate, ending speculation she'd mount a campaign to be Maine's governor.

Why it matters: Collins has been a consistent voice of opposition to Trump's major legislative pushes, most notably voting against his repeal-and-replace efforts every time. By not running for governor, Collins will remain a prominent (and moderate) GOP figure in the Senate.

Go deeper

Trump pardons Michael Flynn

President Trump with Michael Flynn in 2016. Photo: David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

President Trump on Wednesday pardoned his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in the Mueller investigation to lying to FBI agents about his conversations with a former Russian ambassador.

Why it matters: It is the first of multiple pardons expected in the coming weeks, as Axios scooped Tuesday night.

The emerging cybersecurity headaches awaiting Biden

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The incoming administration will face a slew of cybersecurity-related challenges, as Joe Biden takes office under a very different environment than existed when he was last in the White House as vice president.

The big picture: President-elect Biden's top cybersecurity and national security advisers will have to wrestle with the ascendancy of new adversaries and cyberpowers, as well as figure out whether to continue the more aggressive stance the Trump administration has taken in cyberspace.