Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Getty Images

Georgia legislators are advancing a bill that aims to prevent patients from getting surprise medical bills. But that proposal could drive up costs across the board.

Details: The most recent version of the bill says that if patients unexpectedly receive "unanticipated ... out-of-network services," health insurers must pay doctors their full pre-insurance charges, or a metric that averages the highest percentiles of local charges — whichever is less.

  • Insurers would also have to pay out-of-network providers their full charges for ER patients, if the patient isn't quickly transferred to an in-network facility.

The catch: These rates would be very high. If doctors know they will get paid their full charges, or something very close to them, why would they accept lower rates by agreeing to be part of insurers' networks?

BTW: The state senator who is sponsoring the bill, Republican Chuck Hufstetler, is an anesthetist. Hufstetler and his office did not respond to questions.

Go deeper: Why ending surprise medical bills is harder than it looks

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Charles Koch's course correction

In his first on-camera interview in four years, Charles Koch told "Axios on HBO" he's disillusioned with the results of his network's massive political spending, but is optimistic about what he believes will be a less divisive strategy.

Why it matters: Koch — chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, which Forbes yesterday designated as America's largest private company — has been the left's favorite face of big-spending political action.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

What overwhelmed hospitals look like

A healthcare professional suits up to enter a COVID-19 patient's room in the ICU at Van Wert County Hospital in Ohio. Photo: Megan Jelinger/AFP

Utah doctors are doing what they say is the equivalent of rationing care. Intensive care beds in Minnesota are nearly full. And the country overall continues to break hospitalization records — all as millions of Americans travel to spend Thanksgiving with friends and family.

Why it matters: America's health care workers are exhausted, and the sickest coronavirus patients aren't receiving the kind of care that could make the difference between living and dying.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Southwest CEO: "You should fly"

The official guidance of the CDC says that "postponing travel and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others this year."

  • Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly, however, took the opposing position when he was interviewed by "Axios on HBO." "You should fly," he told me, adding that "we need to have as much commerce and business and movement as is safe to do."