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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

At least 7 new members of Congress elected Tuesday have STEM backgrounds — an unusually large number that comes in part due to a concerted effort to recruit candidates with science backgrounds.

Why it matters: Typically, there are just a handful of House members who have science, medicine, or engineering backgrounds. Having a larger crop of members who understand complex scientific topics, from climate change to nuclear engineering, could result in legislation that better incorporates scientific information.

  • It could also improve oversight of science-focused agencies like NASA and the Energy Department, experts told Axios.

The big picture: Scientists were mobilized by how swiftly and broadly the Trump administration moved to roll back regulations on climate change, land use and other issues.

  • The "March for Science" movement led to recruitment drives by groups such as 314 Action, a political action committee that sought to sign scientists up to run for office and support them financially. Several of their endorsed candidates won on Tuesday.

The details: 314 Action endorsed nuclear engineer and Navy veteran Elaine Luria, who narrowly defeated Republican Rep. Scott Taylor in Virginia's 2nd District. They also endorsed marine engineer Joe Cunningham, who beat Republican Katie Arrington to pick up former Rep. Mark Sanford's seat in South Carolina.

“These were all tough Republican districts that these scientists picked up,” said Josh Morrow, executive director of 314 Action.

The winners: The list of new STEM members also includes (all Democrats):

  • Chrissy Houlahan, engineer —6th district, Pennsylvania
  • Lauren Underwood, nurse and health policy specialist—14th district, Illinois
  • Jeff van Drew, dentist — 2nd district, New Jersey
  • Sean Casten, biochemical engineer — 6th district, Illinois
  • Kim Schrier, pediatrician —8th district, Washington

These new members will join two Democratic incumbents: Rep. Bill Foster of Illinois, a physicist, and Rep. Jerry McNerney of California, who has a PhD in mathematics.

There will be one new senator with a STEM background, too: Jacky Rosen, who defeated incumbent Republican Sen. Dean Heller in Nevada. Prior to serving in the House, she was a computer programmer and software developer.

  • Some prominent science advocates lost reelection, however — notably Republican Rep. John Culberson of Texas, a major supporter of NASA's research programs.

Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and himself a physicist and former congressman from New Jersey, told Axios that adding this crop of STEM members is "a big jump" compared to prior numbers.

"We need scientists in Congress to represent the scientific perspective whenever an issue is being discussed," Holt said. Their specific expertise, he said, is less important than the fact that "they will have a professional background in evidence-based thinking."

Go deeper:

Editor's Note: This story has been corrected to fix an error in Congressman-elect Joe Cunningham's first name.

Go deeper

24 mins ago - World

U.S. will give Russians written response to NATO demands, Blinken says

Blinken and Lavrov shake hands in Geneva. Photo: Russian Foreign Ministry / Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Secretary of State Antony Blinken confirmed after a meeting with his Russian counterpart on Friday that the U.S. will provide written answers to Russia's security demands next week.

Why it matters: Russia claims to be waiting for "concrete answers" to its demands that NATO rule out further expansion and roll back its presence in eastern Europe before deciding its next steps on Ukraine. But the U.S. and NATO have called those proposals "non-starters," and Friday's meeting offered no breakthroughs, so it's unclear how written answers might change the equation.

More surprises await scientists at Antarctica's "Doomsday Glacier"

Cliffs along the edge of the Thwaites Ice Shelf in West Antarctica. Photo: James Yungel/NASA

Researchers like David Holland, an atmospheric scientist at New York University, are in a race to understand the fate of a massive glacier in West Antarctica that has earned a disquieting nickname: "The Doomsday Glacier."

Why it matters: Studies show the Thwaites Glacier (its official name) could already be on an irreversible course to melt during the next several decades to centuries, freeing up enough inland ice to raise global sea levels by at least several feet.

Updated 3 hours ago - Health

The case for Operation Warp Speed 2.0

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Omicron's blitz around the world has underscored the need for a new arsenal of COVID vaccines and therapeutics, experts say — and that may require an effort akin to Operation Warp Speed 2.0.

Why it matters: The virus will continue to evolve, potentially in a way that further escapes vaccine protection, and the best way to prevent more global disruptions to everyday life is to have tools ready to combat whatever comes next.