The tragic losses of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain last week — who both took their own lives — drew attention to the broader problem of rising suicide rates around the country.

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Data: Centers for Disease Control; Cartogram: Chris Canipe/Axios

The big picture: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported on Thursday that suicide is the nation's 10th leading cause of death — and the most recent collection of data (2014-2016) shows that suicide rates have increased in almost every state since the turn of the century.

  • 25 states saw an increase in suicide by more than 30%.
  • The rates of increase largely varied. For example, there was an increase of 6% in Delaware, compared to a 57% increase in North Dakota.
  • In 2016, 45,000 Americans 10 years or older committed suicide, according to the CDC.

Be smart: More than half of the people that committed suicide didn't have a diagnosed mental health condition, per the CDC. Many causes of suicide include factors like job, money, or legal stresses, relationship problems, substance abuse, loss, and more.

P.S., via the NYT: If you are having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK). You can find a list of additional resources at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources.

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Updated 9 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: California to independently review FDA-approved coronavirus vaccinesWisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b---ards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown as cases surge — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections

USA Today breaks tradition by endorsing Joe Biden

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

USA Today, one of the largest newspapers by circulation in America, gave Joe Biden its first-ever presidential endorsement on Tuesday.

The big picture: A slew of media companies are endorsing a candidate this year for the first time ever, citing the unprecedented nature of this election.

1 hour ago - Technology

Exclusive: AP to call elections for Alexa and other Big Tech channels

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Many of the world's biggest tech and telecom companies, like Google, Amazon, Microsoft and AT&T, are licensing the Associated Press' election results to power their voice, video and search products, executives tell Axios.

How it works: Because tech firms need to answer millions of unique voice commands and search queries in real time, the results will be coded through an API — an interface that a computer program can read — designed to handle "not enough results in yet" and "too close to call" cases.