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Photo: John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Crises always hit the poor worse than the rich. The art world, however, might be an exception. Museums and galleries are struggling, but street-level artists are more visible then ever.

Why it matters: Street art has been recognized as an important part of art history for decades, and it has always been political-with-a-small-p. The current protests, however, have elevated the art form to a fully-fledged political force.

How it works: Black Lives Matter protests were initially accompanied by looting, which caused businesses to board up their windows with plywood. That in turn was the catalyst for an explosion of political street art.

  • It didn't take long for the new artistic movement to be legitimized and/or co-opted by politicians and corporations painting slogans on their streets and storefronts. Expect an official Black Lives Matter mural outside Trump Tower any day now, to match the one near the White House.
  • New York magazine realized that the best way to demonstrate the unpopularity of Mayor Bill de Blasio was simply to wheatpaste his picture onto the streets of the city, and let New Yorkers express themselves naturally.
  • The Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Virginia, will soon come down — covered in paint and anti-racist graffiti.

The bottom line: Most high-profile art in recent years has been elitist, sealed within a bubble of wealth and privilege. Those days are over. The defining art of 2020 is distributed, anonymous, and much more powerful.

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.

AOC and Ilhan Omar want to block Biden’s former chief of staff

Reps. Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar are boosting a petition against Joe Biden nominating his former chief of staff to a new role in his administration, calling Bruce Reed a "deficit hawk” and criticizing his past support for Social Security and Medicare cuts.

Why it matters: Progressives are mounting their pressure campaign after the president-elect did not include any of their favored candidates in his first slate of Cabinet nominees, and they are serious about installing some of their allies, blocking anyone who doesn't pass their smell test — and making noise if they are not heard.