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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Donald Trump made a fateful decision last month when he attempted to politicize the Fed board.

Between the lines: By nominating Stephen Moore to the board — a Republican partisan rather than an economic technocrat — Trump turned the genteel if inefficient process of Fed nominations into something much more bare-knuckled.

  • The Guardian went into full-on muckraking mode, finding first that the government has accused Moore of owing $75,000 in back taxes, and then that a judge ruled in 2012 that Moore had failed to pay more than $300,000 of spousal support and child support to his ex-wife.
  • An epic Twitter thread from policy wonk Sam Bell has dug up Moore calling for rate hikes in August 2008, not to mention the abolition of the Fed and the reinstatement of the gold standard.

Winners: Trump wins this round even if Moore's reputation is ruined and his nomination never reaches the Senate. We're watching a familiar Trump play — by going on the offensive and infuriating the sophisticates, Trump and his allies get to congratulate themselves on shaking up the system.

Losers: Moore surely can't be enjoying seeing details from his divorce proceedings splashed across the press. But the biggest loser is the Fed itself, fighting daily to avoid being dragged into the swamp.

Go deeper

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

1 hour ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

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