Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP; Ethan Miller via Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) led a group of 27 Democratic senators on Monday in demanding that President Trump remove senior White House adviser Stephen Miller, following a report from the Southern Poverty Law Center that alleged he shared white nationalist content with the right-wing news site Breitbart.

The big picture: "Mr. Miller's demonstrable white nationalist ideology has been directly translated into your administration's policies, which have been widely criticized for systematically targeting communities of color," the senators write in a letter.

  • They point to Trump's 2017 travel ban, family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border and other immigration policies reportedly shaped by Miller, claiming that "every one of them aligns with the white nationalist ideals espoused by Mr. Miller in his e-mails."

What they're saying: In response to the SPLC report, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said last month, "The SPLC ... is an utterly discredited, long-debunked far-left smear organization that has recently been forced — to its great humiliation — to issue a major retraction for other wholly fabricated accusations. They libel, slander and defame conservatives for a living. They are beneath public discussion."

Go deeper: Group says Stephen Miller shared story ideas on race, immigration with Breitbart

Go deeper

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

BodyArmor is making noise in the sports drink market, announcing seven new athlete partnerships last week, including Christian McCaffrey, Sabrina Ionescu and Ronald Acuña Jr.

Why it matters: It wants to market itself as a worthy challenger to the throne that Gatorade has occupied for nearly six decades.

S&P 500's historic rebound leaves investors divided on future

Data: Money.net; Chart: Axios Visuals

The S&P 500 nearly closed at an all-time high on Wednesday and remains poised to go from peak to trough to peak in less than half a year.

By the numbers: Since hitting its low on March 23, the S&P has risen about 50%, with more than 40 of its members doubling, according to Bloomberg. The $12 trillion dollars of share value that vanished in late March has almost completely returned.

Newsrooms abandoned as pandemic drags on

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facing enormous financial pressure and uncertainty around reopenings, media companies are giving up on their years-long building leases for more permanent work-from-home structures. Others are letting employees work remotely for the foreseeable future.

Why it matters: Real estate is often the most expensive asset that media companies own. And for companies that don't own their space, it's often the biggest expense.