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President Trump at a press briefing on Aug. 10. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's executive action calling on states to provide 25% of an additional $400 in weekly unemployment benefits poses "significant administrative burdens and costs," according to a bipartisan letter from the leaders of the National Governors Association.

Why it matters: Many states have had their budgets decimated by the coronavirus pandemic and cannot afford pitching in an $100 extra per unemployed resident. Several state unemployment offices told Axios that they don't even know how the program works, and that any changes to state unemployment systems would take weeks to implement.

What they're saying: "We appreciate the White House’s proposals to provide additional solutions to address economic challenges; however, we are concerned about the significant administrative burdens and costs this latest action would place on the states," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) and Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) said in a letter released Monday.

  • "NGA has requested $500 billion in unrestricted state aid and NGA continues to urge Congress and the White House to reach a quick resolution to provide immediate assistance to unemployed Americans."

The big picture: Trump signed a series of executive memos related to coronavirus relief on Saturday after negotiations with Congress broke down. The primary sticking point in stimulus talks remains Democrats' demands for extra funding for state and local governments, which Republicans have dismissed as a "bailout" for years of poorly-run state budgets.

Go deeper ... Pelosi: "States don't have the money" for Trump's unemployment order

Go deeper

Nov 18, 2020 - Health

NYC will again close public schools amid virus surge

A student is informed by a crossing guard of a temporary school closure in Brooklyn. Photo: Michael Nagle/Xinhua via Getty Images

New York City's public school system will close for in-person learning beginning Thursday after coronavirus positivity rates in the city topped 3%, according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Why it matters: The city, which is staring down a second coronavirus wave after being the world's epicenter for the pandemic earlier this year, previously boasted having more students physically in classrooms than nearly any other locality in the country, per the New York Times.

At least six cases in six days: Newhouse and Lamborn test positive for COVID-19

Photo: Chip Somodevilla via Getty

Reps. Dan Newhouse (R-Wash.) and Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) have tested positive for COVID-19, increasing the tally of lawmakers across the U.S. who have contracted the virus.

The big picture: The two announcements on Wednesday follow positive tests for Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.), Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D-Colo.), Rep. Tim Walberg (R-Mich.) and Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska) in the latest string of outbreaks.

Updated Nov 18, 2020 - Health

FDA approves first coronavirus test for self-testing at home

Laura Robles, 14, takes a swab at a COVID-19 testing site in Los Angeles on Nov. 11. The Lucira test kit is a nasal swab to be used by people aged 14 or older. Photo: Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration announced in a post Tuesday night that it has issued an emergency use authorization for the first COVID-19 test for self-testing at home — and it returns rapid results.

Why it matters: Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the virus are accelerating across the U.S. This rapid home test could help reduce testing delays.