President Trump said that he'd directed the Veterans Affairs system to buy "a lot" of a new antidepressant, but so far the agency has treated only 15 veterans with it, STAT reports.

The intrigue: The drug — Spravato, a nasal spray developed by Janssen — has been cautiously rolled out, partially because of questions surrounding the data used for the drug's approval and, thus, its effectiveness.

  • The VA's medical advisory board declined to approve coverage of Spravato for all veterans over the summer, and restricted its use to limited scenarios.
  • The drug's rollout in private clinics and hospitals has also been slow, as providers have struggled to get preauthorization from insurers to administer the drug or reimbursement for monitoring patients after they take it.

The bottom line: Although Trump touted the drug as having "incredible" results, it's available in only seven VA facilities out of 1,200.

Go deeper: Concerns mount over depression drug Spravato as VA approval looms

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What they're saying: Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a "tireless and resolute champion of justice"

Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaking in February. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading figures paid tribute to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Friday night at age 87.

What they're saying: “Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature," Chief Justice John Roberts said. "We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at age 87, the Supreme Court announced Friday evening.

Why it matters: Ginsburg had suffered from serious health issues over the past few years. Her death sets up a fight over filling a Supreme Court seat with less than 50 days until the election.

NYT: White House drug price negotiations broke down over $100 "Trump Cards"

President Trump with Mark Meadows, his chief of staff, on Sept. 3 at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Negotiations on a deal between the White House and pharmaceutical industry to lower drug prices broke down last month after Mark Meadows, the president's chief of staff, insisted that drugmakers pay for $100 cash cards to be mailed to seniors before the election, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: Some of the drug companies feared that in agreeing to the prescription cards — reportedly dubbed "Trump Cards" by some in the pharmaceutical industry — they would boost Trump's political standing weeks ahead of Election Day with voters over 65, a group that is crucial to the president's reelection bid, per the Times.