Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The Falcon 9 rocket standing on the pad during a test. Photo: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Four astronauts are set to launch to the International Space Station on Sunday aboard a SpaceX capsule.

Why it matters: This flight will be the company's second crewed launch for NASA and is expected to be the first of many regular flights to the station, helping end the space agency's reliance on Russian rockets for crewed missions.

Where it stands: The Falcon 9 rocket carrying NASA's Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker, Victor Glover and Japan's Soichi Noguchi is expected to take flight from Florida at 7:27pm ET.

What's next: If all goes according to plan and the mission launches on time, the four astronauts are expected to dock to the space station on Monday.

The big picture: As NASA plans for this launch, the space agency's past failures are never far from the minds of the people on the ground responsible for making sure that this mission succeeds.

  • "I was there through Columbia too ... and what you learn is, you have to be vigilant," NASA's head of human spaceflight Kathryn Lueders said during a press conference ahead of launch. "You have to make sure that you're listening to the data."

Editor's note: This story has been corrected to say that the astronauts will dock with the space station on Monday, not Sunday.

Go deeper

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
Dec 1, 2020 - Science

The many ways foreign powers can mess with satellites

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Some nations are capable of disabling satellites without destroying them, opening up different avenues for how conflicts may play out in space.

The big picture: One of the major concerns about warfare in space is the uncontrollable nature of space junk created from destroying or permanently disabling satellites.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!