Nov 11, 2019

Report: Southwest risks grounding of 3 dozen jets over safety concerns

Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

Southwest Airline Co. currently lacks the proper paperwork to confirm that three dozen of its jets meet all federal safety standards as regulators consider grounding the planes, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Why it matters: "Southwest's difficulty documenting the maintenance history of the used planes is unusual," writes the Journal.

Without the proper paperwork, Southwest and regulators cannot definitively say the planes are safe.

  • The company told the Federal Aviation Administration the planes in question were purchased by foreign operators, and some of the previous repairs have been found to be substandard, per the Wall Street Journal.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Southwest pilots' union head blasts Boeing over handling of 737 MAX

Southwest Airlines' Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Jon Weaks, the president of Southwest Airlines' pilot union, on Wednesday accused Boeing of pressuring regulators to fast-track the ungrounding of the 737 MAX aircraft in a memo to the union's members.

"Boeing will never, and should not ever, be given the benefit of the doubt again. The combination of arrogance, ignorance, and greed should and will haunt Boeing for eternity."
Go deeperArrowNov 14, 2019

FAA says it will inspect each Boeing 737 MAX before delivery

Boeing 737 MAX airplanes. Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images

The Federal Aviation Administration said in a letter Tuesday that it intends to individually inspect and approve every 737 MAX before Boeing can deliver them to airlines, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: Despite public pressure from Boeing to get the 737 MAX back in the air as soon as January, the agency's decision removes the aircraft maker's authority to perform its own pre-delivery safety checks and sign-offs — and could draw out the aircraft's ungrounding process.

Go deeper: Southwest pilots' union head blasts Boeing over handling of 737 MAX

Keep ReadingArrowNov 27, 2019

Boeing settles four lawsuits in the wake of 737 MAX crashes

Nadia Milleron, whose daughter Samya Stumo, was killed in the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, holds a picture of Boeing 737 Max jet crash victims during the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee in October. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images

Boeing settled four lawsuits with a Seattle law firm on Friday that's representing families of passengers who died when the Lion Air flight crashed in Ethiopia in Oct. 2018, AP reports.

Why it matters: Boeing has taken heat over how it responded in the aftermath of the two crashes that collectively killed 346 passengers. In early November, lawmakers grilled CEO Dennis Muilenburg over how much he was paid following the crashes.

Go deeperArrowNov 16, 2019