SaveSave story

Southern California fires enter Los Angeles County

The Thomas Fire in Ventura County
A man looks on from the road as the Thomas fire burns in Ventura, California. Photo: Noah Berger / AP

Flames from the southern California wildfires have spread to the edge of the 405 in Los Angeles — the nation's busiest highway which carries over 400,000 vehicles per day. The fires were only about 5–10% contained as of Thursday morning, the LA Times reports.

By the numbers: The largest fire — the Thomas — is burning across 96,000 acres in Ventura County and has forced 50,000 evacuations. The Creek fire has pushed 110,000 people out of Sylmar in Los Angeles County and is burning about 13,000 acres. A total of 200 buildings and homes have been damaged or destroyed across southern California.

Fire crews reported Wednesday night that they found a woman's body in a burn area near Ojai, California, per the LA Times. It is not clear whether she died due to the wildfire. Smaller fires have started burning in other parts of Ventura and LA counties, including the Skirball fire which burned about 500 acres in the upscale LA neighborhood of Bel-Air.

A satellite image of the California fires. Photo: NASA

A Los Angeles County firefighter at the scene of a burning home. Photo: Chris Carlson / AP

A helicopter drops water over the Creek fire. Photo: Chris Carlson / AP

Jonathan Swan 4 hours ago
SaveSave story

Bolton bombshell: the clashes to come

John Bolton
John Bolton speaks at CPAC in 2016. Photo: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sources close to President Trump say he feels John Bolton, hurriedly named last night to replace H.R. McMaster as national security adviser, will finally deliver the foreign policy the president wants — particularly on Iran and North Korea.

Why it matters: We can’t overstate how dramatic a change it is for Trump to replace H.R. McMaster with Bolton, who was U.S. ambassador to the U.N. under President George W. Bush.

Erica Pandey 5 hours ago
SaveSave story

How China became a global power of espionage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

As China’s influence spreads to every corner of the globe under President Xi Jinping, so do its spies.

Why it matters: China has the money and the ambition to build a vast foreign intelligence network, including inside the United States. Meanwhile, American intelligence-gathering on China is falling short, Chris Johnson, a former senior China analyst for the CIA who's now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Axios: "We have to at least live up to [China's] expectations. And we aren't doing that."