Apr 9, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Some Trump aides eye May 1 start to coronavirus reopening

President Trump was flanked at yesterday's briefing by HHS Secretary Alex Azar (far left), Vice President Pence and Deborah Birx. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump's aides, encouraged by virus data showing fewer deaths than once projected, are working behind the scenes to deliver on his vow to reopen America "sooner rather than later."

What to watch: A senior White House official said there’s a lot of internal energy pushing for May 1, because that's the end of the White House's "30 Days to Slow the Spread."

  • That energy is especially coming from some of the more economic and politically minded aides. "We are looking at when the data will allow the opportunity to reopen," said the official.
  • But there are "a lot of different scenarios" and "not one plan that people are rallying around,” the official said.
  • The West Wing is not close to a decision. And officials insist they'll follow data, not dates.

Public health officials are very wary of optimistic talk of an imminent reopening from some members of the White House economic team.

  • A senior HHS official said, "Talk of reopening the American economy — when we don’t fully understand the virus, and can’t even crank our own domestic assembly lines to make diagnostic tests, respirators and ventilators — isn't just myopic, it's flat out ridiculous."
  • "The president’s primary focus continues to be the health and safety of the American people," said one top official defending the president. "That being said, he is committed to leading a historic economic recovery and will begin to lay the foundation of that effort as we continue to navigate the pandemic."

The federal government will ultimately defer to governors.

  • But in a signpost to the internal conversation about a phased-in return to work, the CDC yesterday posted guidance on how critical employees who have been exposed to COVID-19 can return to work.
  • That includes screening by temperature and symptoms, regular monitoring, a requirement that the worker wears a mask for 14 days since the last exposure, social distancing, and disinfection of workspace.

Some officials worry the economy will remain soft even after the guidance changes: The fear level could remain high, and people may stay home anyway.

  • And one key to mitigating that fear — readily available testing for all Americans and antibody testing — isn't there yet.

The bottom line per a senior administration official: "People who put specific dates out there will continue to lose."

  • Trump pivoted away from a date again yesterday, saying he’d consult with his health professionals — and watch the curve.

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18 hours ago - Health

Protests against police brutality threaten coronavirus response

Protesters in Philadelphia on June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Protests against police brutality have prompted the closure of coronavirus test sites across the country, including in Pennsylvania, Florida, California and Illinois, Politico reports.

Why it matters: This adds to concerns that the protests themselves create an environment in which the virus can easily spread, particularly if and when protesters aren't wearing masks or social distancing.

Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: Protesters were still out en masse even as curfews set in Washington, D.C., and New York City. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) slammed the New York Police Department late Tuesday following reports of police kettling in protesters on Manhattan Bridge.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).