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Photo: Taylor Hill / FilmMagic via Getty Images

Dozens of women, including Wynn Resorts employees, have accused Las Vegas casino mogul Steve Wynn of engaging in behavior that amounts to "a decades-long pattern of sexual misconduct," in interviews with the WSJ. Several accounts include detailed instances of him pressuring employees to perform sex acts.

Why it matters: Wynn, who denied the allegations, is the latest public figure to be swept up in the #MeToo movement. But as a billionaire CEO and finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, he is also one of the first men in his highly-regulated industry to face such accusations.

The allegations:

  • A manicurist who worked at Wynn Las Vegas shortly after it opened in 2005 told several people that the billionaire had "pressured her to take her off and told her to lie on the massage table he kept in his office suite." After hearing the account, the woman’s supervisor told the WSJ that she filed a detailed report to the casino’s human-resources department. Wynn reportedly paid the manicurist a $7.5 million settlement, which his attorneys admitted in a court filing.
  • Another former employee described Wynn asking them to massage his penis or perform oral sex during an appointment.
  • Others told WSJ that they sometimes made up fake appointments so other female workers had an excuse to deny Wynn's request for services. They also described how some female employees hid in the bathroom or back rooms when they learned he was on headed to the salon.
  • Go deeper: Read more of the accusations at the WSJ.

Wynn's response: "The idea that I ever assaulted any woman is preposterous,” he said in written statement to the WSJ. “We find ourselves in a world where people can make allegations, regardless of the truth, and a person is left with the choice of weathering insulting publicity or engaging in multi-year lawsuits.”

Wynn Resorts also said that it requires annual anti-harassment training for all staff, and offers an anonymous hotline. “Since the inception of the company, not one complaint was made to that hotline regarding Mr. Wynn,” the company told WSJ.

Timing: Wynn's ex-wife, Elaine Wynn, has filed a lawsuit seeking to free herself from the restrictions on the sale of her stock in Wynn Resorts. In the filing, Elaine Wynn pointed to the settlement her ex-husband made to the manicurist

Note from WSJ: "The Journal contacted more than 150 people who work or had worked for Mr. Wynn; none reached out to the Journal on their own. Most of those who spoke to the Journal about Mr. Wynn said they worried that doing so could hurt their ability to work elsewhere because of his influence in the casino industry and the state."

Go deeper

Collins helps contractor before pro-Susan PAC gets donation

Sen. Susan Collins during her reelection campaign. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A PAC backing Sen. Susan Collins in her high-stakes reelection campaign received $150,000 from an entity linked to the wife of a defense contractor whose firm Collins helped land a federal contract, new public records show.

Why it matters: The executive, Martin Kao of Honolulu, leaned heavily on his political connections to boost his business, federal prosecutors say in an ongoing criminal case against him. The donation linked to Kao was veiled until last week.

How cutting GOP corporate cash could backfire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Companies pulling back on political donations, particularly to members of Congress who voted against certifying President Biden's election win, could inadvertently push Republicans to embrace their party's rightward fringe.

Why it matters: Scores of corporate PACs have paused, scaled back or entirely abandoned their political giving programs. While designed to distance those companies from events that coincided with this month's deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol, research suggests the moves could actually empower the far-right.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Scoop: Kaine, Collins pitch Senate colleagues on censuring Trump

Sen. Tim Kaine speaks with Sen. Susan Collins. Photo: Andrew Harnik/AP via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine and Susan Collins are privately pitching their colleagues on a bipartisan resolution censuring former President Trump, three sources familiar with the discussions tell Axios.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction in his second impeachment.