Sen. Amy Klobuchar. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Senators Roy Blunt and Amy Klobuchar, the heads of the Senate Rules Committee, have come to a conclusion about reform on reporting sexual harassment on Capitol Hill, NBC reports, that could eliminate the "cooling off period" before a victim's sexual complaint can move forward and require lawmakers "to personally pay out of pocket for any settlement reached."

Why it matters: Since the beginning of the #MeToo movement, Congress has been a focal point in calling for change in how sexual harassment is reported. There hasn't been a time set for a vote, but Sen. Blunt said it "would be great if we could get this done before the Memorial Day break."

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Big Pharma launches $1B venture to incentivize new antibiotics

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

A group of large drug companies launched a $1 billion AMR Action Fund Thursday in collaboration with policymakers, philanthropists and development banks to push the development of two to four new antibiotics by 2030.

Why it matters: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing problem — possibly killing up to 20 million people annually by 2050 — but a severe lack of R&D market incentives has hampered efforts to develop a robust antibiotic pipeline to address the issue.

Updated 29 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inside Geoffrey Berman's closed-door testimony

Berman arrives on Capitol Hill Thursday. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Geoffrey Berman, the former top federal prosecutor in Manhattan, was expected to say in closed-door testimony today that Attorney General Bill Barr repeatedly urged him to take another job, warned him that getting fired would not be good for his resume or job prospects and steered him toward a high-level Justice Department post in DC.

Driving the news: Axios has obtained a copy of Berman's opening statement for his closed-door hearing before the House Judiciary Committee.

39 mins ago - Health

Schools confront broadband access crisis

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

School districts are taking it upon themselves to help families get connected to the internet as they face down a long future of virtual learning.

Why it matters: In the COVID-19 era of education, broadband is an essential service that families need to stay connected — and that school systems require to equitably educate children in their districts.